Film Review – CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (2013)

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (2013, USA) ****½
Action, Drama, Thriller

dist. Columbia Pictures (USA), Sony Pictures Releasing (UK); pr co. Michael De Luca Productions / Scott Rudin Productions / Trigger Street Productions; d. Paul Greengrass; w. Billy Ray (based upon the book “A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALS, and Dangerous Days at Sea” by Richard Phillips & Stephan Talty); exec pr. Eli Bush, Gregory Goodman, Kevin Spacey; pr. Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca, Scott Rudin; ph. Barry Ackroyd (Technicolor. 35 mm (anamorphic) (partial blow-up) (Fuji Eterna-CP 3514DI), D-Cinema. ARRIRAW (2.8K) (source format) (some scenes), Digital Intermediate (4K) (master format), Super 16 (source format) (some scenes), Super 35 (also 3-perf) (source format), VistaVision (source format) (visual effects). 2.39:1); m. Henry Jackman; ed. Christopher Rouse; pd. Paul Kirby; ad. Aziz Hamichi; set d. Dominic Capon; cos. Mark Bridges; m/up. Frances Hannon; sd. Oliver Tarney, Michael Fentum, James Harrison (SDDS | Datasat | Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos | Dolby Surround 7.1); sfx. Dominic Tuohy; vfx. Daniel Barrow, Andy Taylor, Kris Wright, Charlie Noble, Adam Rowland; st. Rob Inch; rel. 27 September 2013 (USA), 9 October 2013 (UK); cert: PG-13/12; r/t. 135m.

cast: Tom Hanks (Captain Richard Phillips), Catherine Keener (Andrea Phillips), Barkhad Abdi (Muse), Barkhad Abdirahman (Bilal), Faysal Ahmed (Najee), Mahat M. Ali (Elmi), Michael Chernus (Shane Murphy), David Warshofsky (Mike Perry), Corey Johnson (Ken Quinn), Chris Mulkey (John Cronan), Yul Vazquez (Captain Frank Castellano), Max Martini (SEAL Commander), Omar Berdouni (Nemo), Mohamed Ali (Asad), Issak Farah Samatar (Hufan), Thomas Grube (Maersk Alabama Crew), Mark Holden (Maersk Alabama Crew), San Shella (Maersk Alabama Crew), Terence Anderson (Maersk Alabama Crew), Marc Anwar (Maersk Alabama Crew), David Webber (Maersk Alabama Crew), Amr El-Bayoumi (Maersk Alabama Crew), Vincenzo Nicoli (Maersk Alabama Crew), Kapil Arun (Maersk Alabama Crew), Louis Mahoney (Maersk Alabama Crew), Peter Landi (Maersk Alabama Crew), Angus MacInnes (Maersk Alabama Crew), Ian Ralph (Maersk Alabama Crew), Kristian Hjordt Beck (Maersk Alabama Crew), Kurt Larsen (Maersk Alabama Crew), Bader Choukouko (Somali Boy), Idurus Shiish (Pirate Leader), Azeez Mohammed (Pirate Leader), Abdurazak Ahmed Adan (Pirate Leader), Duran Mohamed Hassan (Asad’s Crew), Nasir Jama (Asad’s Crew), Kadz Souleiman (Asad’s Crew), Scott Oates (Navy SEAL Group), David B. Meadows (Navy SEAL Group), Shad Jason Hamilton (Navy SEAL Group), Adam Wendling (Navy SEAL Group), Billy Jenkins (Navy SEAL Group), Mark Semos (Navy SEAL Group), Dean Franchuk (Navy SEAL Group), Rey Hernandez (Navy SEAL Group), Christopher Stadulis (Navy SEAL Group), Roger Edwards (Navy SEAL Group), John Patrick Barry (Navy SEAL Group), Raleigh Morse (Navy SEAL Group), Dale McClellan (Navy SEAL Group), Hugh Middleton (Navy SEAL Group), Raymond Care (Navy SEAL Group), Stacha Hicks (UKMTO Officer), Will Bowden (US Maritime Officer), Len Anderson IV (USS Bainbridge VBSS Officer).

In April 2009, the U.S. containership Maersk Alabama sails toward its destination on a day that seems like any other. Suddenly, Somali pirates race toward the vessel, climb aboard and take everyone hostage. The captain of the ship, Richard Phillips (Hanks), looks to protect his crew from the hostile invaders, and their leader, Muse (Abdi). The pirates are after millions of dollars, and Phillips must use his wits to make sure everyone survives and returns home safely. Greengrass provides a masterclass in building tension and then holding it, whilst Hanks gives one of his absolute best performances and is totally believable as the experienced captain trying to stay one step ahead of the Somali pirates. Abdi is also excellent as the skinny leader of the pirate group. The film has been criticised for lacking sufficient background and motivation on the Somalians, but in fact there are subtle points made about the gulf between the might of those who have (represented by the US Navy) and the futility of those who have not (the Somalian fishermen forced into piracy). Credit to Greengrass for showing the shock and trauma of Hanks’ character once rescued – a scene devastatingly real as performed by Hanks.

AAN: Best Motion Picture of the Year (Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca); Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role (Barkhad Abdi); Best Achievement in Film Editing (Christopher Rouse); Best Achievement in Sound Editing (Oliver Tarney); Best Achievement in Sound Mixing (Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Prestwood Smith, Chris Munro); Best Writing, Adapted Screenplay (Billy Ray)

Film Review – CAST AWAY (2000)

CAST AWAY (2000, USA) ****
Adventure, Drama, Romance

dist. Twentieth Century Fox; pr co. Twentieth Century Fox / Dreamworks Pictures / ImageMovers / Playtone; d. Robert Zemeckis; w. William Broyles Jr.; exec pr. Joan Bradshaw; pr. Tom Hanks, Jack Rapke, Steve Starkey, Robert Zemeckis; assoc pr. Steven J. Boyd, Cherylanne Martin; ph. Don Burgess (DeLuxe. 35 mm (Kodak Vision 2383). Spherical. 1.85:1); m. Alan Silvestri; ed. Arthur Schmidt; pd. Rick Carter; ad. Stefan Dechant, Elizabeth Lapp, William James Teegarden; set d. Rosemary Brandenburg, Karen O’Hara; cos. Joanna Johnston; m/up. Daniel C. Striepeke, Kathryn Blondell, Ronnie Specter; sd. Randy Thom, Dennis Leonard, William B. Kaplan, Ken Fischer, David C. Hughes (SDDS | DTS | Dolby Digital); sfx. John Frazier; vfx. Harry Gundersen, Eric Hanson, Ken Ralston; st. Doug Coleman, Bud Davis; rel. 7 December 2000 (USA), 12 January 2001 (UK); cert: PG-13/12; r/t. 143m.

cast: Tom Hanks (Chuck Noland), Helen Hunt (Kelly Frears), Nick Searcy (Stan), Jenifer Lewis (Becca Twig), Geoffrey Blake (Maynard Graham), Peter Von Berg (Yuri), Chris Noth (Jerry Lovett), Lari White (Bettina Peterson), Paul Sanchez (Ramon), Leonid Citer (Fyodor), David Allen Brooks (Dick Peterson), Yelena Popovic (Beautiful Russian Woman), Valentina Ananina (Russian Babushka), Semion Sudarikov (Nicolai), Dmitri S. Boudrine (Lev), François Duhamel (French FedEx Loader), Michael Forest (Pilot Jack), Viveka Davis (Lady from Dick Bettina farm), Jennifer Choe (Memphis State Student), Nan Martin (Kelly’s Mother).

Hanks stars as Chuck Noland, a FedEx systems engineer whose personal and professional life are ruled by the clock. His manic existence abruptly ends when, after a plane crash, he becomes isolated on a remote island – cast away into the most desolate environment imaginable. Hanks delivers a superb performance, holding then screen for the most its running time. He superbly relays the character’s instinct and will to survive in a hostile environment along with the mental impact and emotional scars the experience leaves on him. The film is bookended with a set-up and resolution to his relationship with Hunt. It is here the film admirably tries to keep a balanced view but falls into some of the trappings of soap opera, However, the two stars play the scenes perfectly and elevate them above the material. Also notable in a supporting role is Searcy as Hanks’ closest work colleague. Technical attributes are strong. The photography is colourful; the plane crash scene tensely portrays the terror and confusion; Zemeckis directs with a sure hand and uses the FedEx delivery system as a neat way of topping and tailing the story. But it is Hanks’ film and his solo turn on his desert island that is the heart and soul of the production. The film was shot in two blocks over a year apart to allow Hanks to lose weight and grow his hair for the four-year gap in the story.

AAN: Best Actor in a Leading Role (Tom Hanks); Best Sound (Randy Thom, Tom Johnson, Dennis S. Sands, William B. Kaplan)

Film Review – YOU’VE GOT MAIL (1998)

Image result for you've got mail 1998You’ve Got Mail (1998; USA; Technicolor; 119m) ***½ d. Nora Ephron; w. Nora Ephron, Delia Ephron; ph. John Lindley; m. George Fenton.  Cast: Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Parker Posey, Jean Stapleton, Steve Zahn, Dave Chappelle, Greg Kinnear, Dabney Coleman, Jeffrey Scaperrotta, John Randolph, Heather Burns, Hallee Hirsh, Cara Seymour, Katie Finneran, Michael Badalucco. Two business rivals hate each other at the office but fall in love over the internet. Hanks and Ryan replicate their SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE routine in this amiable romantic comedy. Their on-screen chemistry adds significantly to the predictability of the story. Whilst much of the scenario is overly contrived it maintains a warmth and a sprinkling of satire that proves enough to win through. Based on the play “Parfumerie” by Nikolaus Laszlo previously filmed as THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER (1940). [PG]

Film Review – THE POST (2017)

Image result for the post 2017Post, The (2017; USA; Colour; 116m) **** d. Steven Spielberg; w. Liz Hannah, Josh Singer; ph. Janusz Kaminski; m. John Williams.  Cast: Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Bruce Greenwood, Bob Odenkirk, Tracy Letts, Sarah Paulson, Matthew Rhys, Alison Brie, Carrie Coon, Jesse Plemons, Bradley Whitford, David Cross, Michael Stuhlbarg, Zack Woods, Pat Healy, Deirdre Lovejoy. Based on true events from 1971, in which American newspapers race to expose a government cover-up of Vietnam War secrets. Absorbing newspaper drama driven by top-class performances from Streep and Hanks. Occasional lapses into over-egging some of the politIcial and social messages is only drawback. Authentic recreation of environment and historical context add to power behind the message around freedom of the press. [12]

Film Review – SULLY (2016)

Image result for sully blu-raySully (2016; USA; Colour; 96m) ∗∗∗½  d. Clint Eastwood; w. Todd Komarnicki; ph. Tom Stern; m. Christian Jacob, Tierney Sutton Band.  Cast: Tom Hanks, Aaron Eckhart, Laura Linney, Anna Gunn, Autumn Reeser, Sam Huntington, Jerry Ferrara, Jeff Kober, Chris Bauer, Holt McCallany, Carla Shinall, Lynn Marocola, Max Adler, Valerie Mahaffey, Ashley Austin Morris, Michael Rapaport. Based on the true story of Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, who safely crash-landed a plane on the Hudson River in 2009. Efficiently made account of the investigation that followed. Hanks adds depth and dignity to his portrayal of the everyman hero, whilst Eastwood’s no-fuss direction ensures there is no Hollywood-isation of the story. Adapted from the book by Chelsey Sullenberg and Jeffrey Zaslow [12]

Film Review – APOLLO 13 (1995)

Apollo 13 (1995; USA; DeLuxe; 141m) ∗∗∗∗½  d. Ron Howard; w. William Broyles Jr., Al Reinert; ph. Dean Cundey; m. James Horner.  Cast: Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton, Kevin Bacon, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris, Kathleen Quinlan, Mary Kate Schellhardt, Emily Ann Lloyd, Miko Hughes, Max Elliott Slade, Jean Speegle Howard, Tracy Reiner, David Andrews, Michelle Little, Chris Ellis. True story of the moon-bound mission that developed severe trouble and the men that rescued it with skill and dedication. Thoroughly absorbing account, authentically portrayed and superbly acted – notably by Hanks as mission leader and Harris as flight control. Based on the book “Lost Moon” by Jim Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger. Won Oscars for Editing and Sound. A digitally remastered IMAX-format version was released in September 2002 and was 20m shorter. [PG]

Film Review – THE TERMINAL (2004)

Terminal, The (2004; USA; Technicolor; 129m) ∗∗∗  d. Steven Spielberg; w. Sacha Gervasi, Jeff Nathanson, Andrew Niccol; ph. Janusz Kaminski; m. John Williams.  Cast: Tom Hanks, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci, Chi McBride, Diego Luna, Barry Shabaka Henley, Kumar Pallana, Zoe Saldana, Eddie Jones, Michael Nouri. An eastern immigrant finds himself stranded in JFK airport, and must take up temporary residence there. Although based on real events, this feel-good movie has feels manufactured for a mass audience despite some satirical sequences. Hanks is excellent, as usual, as the European refugee, but the scenes with Zeta-Jones and the increasingly clichéd approach to the airport authorities betray the manipulative and predictable nature of Spielberg’s film. [12]