Film Review – THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW (2004)

THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW (2004, USA, 124m, 12) ***
Action, Adventure, Drama, Sci-Fi, Thriller
dist. Twentieth Century Fox; pr co. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation / Centropolis Entertainment / Lions Gate Films / Mark Gordon Productions; d. Roland Emmerich; w. Roland Emmerich, Jeffrey Nachmanoff (based on a story by Roland Emmerich); pr. Roland Emmerich, Mark Gordon, Thomas M. Hammel; ph. Ueli Steiger (DeLuxe | 2.39:1); m. Harald Kloser; ed. David Brenner; pd. Barry Chusid; ad. Claude Paré.
cast: Dennis Quaid (Jack Hall), Jake Gyllenhaal (Sam Hall), Emmy Rossum (Laura Chapman), Dash Mihok (Jason Evans), Jay O. Sanders (Frank Harris), Sela Ward (Dr. Lucy Hall), Austin Nichols (J.D.), Arjay Smith (Brian Parks), Tamlyn Tomita (Janet Tokada), Sasha Roiz (Parker), Ian Holm (Terry Rapson), Robin Wilcock (Tony), Jason Blicker (Paul), Kenneth Moskow (Bob), Tim Hamaguchi (Taka), Glenn Plummer (Luther), Adrian Lester (Simon), Richard McMillan (Dennis), Perry King (President Blake), Mimi Kuzyk (Secretary of State).
Even global warming advocates may baulk at the situations presented in this far-fetched, but surprisingly enjoyable disaster epic. After climatologist Quaid is largely ignored by U.N. officials when presenting his environmental concerns, his research proves true when an enormous “superstorm” develops, setting off catastrophic natural disasters throughout the world. Trying to get to his son, Gyllenhaal, who is trapped in New York with his friend Rossum and others, Quaid and his crew must travel by foot from Philadelphia, braving the elements, to get to Sam before it’s too late. The game and likeable cast keep their faith in the lame script, delivering awkward dialogue without a metaphorical wink to the audience. Emmerich loves destroying his iconic buildings and landmarks and here he and his effects team take their carnage to impressive set-pieces in LA and NYC. He asks an awful lot of his audience to suspend their disbelief, but for those willing to do so this is a fun ride.

Film Review – THE FUGITIVE (1993)

1993 – The Fugitive – Academy Award Best Picture WinnersTHE FUGITIVE (USA, 1993) ****
      Distributor: Warner Bros; Production Company: Warner Bros. / Kopelson Entertainment; Release Date: 29 July 1993 (USA), 24 September 1993 (UK); Filming Dates: 3 February 1993 – 15 May 1993; Running Time: 130m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby Stereo (4 channels); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Andrew Davis; Writer: Jeb Stuart, David Twohy (based on a story by David Twohy and characters created by Roy Huggins); Executive Producer: Keith Barish, Roy Huggins; Producer: Arnold Kopelson; Director of Photography: Michael Chapman; Music Composer: James Newton Howard; Film Editor: Don Brochu, David Finfer, Dean Goodhill, Dov Hoenig, Richard Nord, Dennis Virkler; Casting Director: Cathy Sandrich Gelfond, Amanda Mackey; Production Designer: J. Dennis Washington; Art Director: Maher Ahmad; Set Decorator: Rick Gentz; Costumes: Aggie Guerard Rodgers; Make-up: Peter Robb-King, Kathe Swanson; Sound: Bruce Stambler; Special Effects: Roy Arbogast, Tom Ryba; Visual Effects: William Mesa.
      Cast: Harrison Ford (Dr. Richard Kimble), Tommy Lee Jones (Samuel Gerard), Sela Ward (Helen Kimble), Julianne Moore (Dr. Anne Eastman), Joe Pantoliano (Cosmo Renfro), Andreas Katsulas (Sykes), Jeroen Krabbé (Dr. Charles Nichols (as Jeroen Krabbe)), Daniel Roebuck (Biggs), L. Scott Caldwell (Poole), Tom Wood (Newman), Ron Dean (Detective Kelly), Joseph F. Kosala (Detective Rosetti), Miguel Nino (Chicago Cop #1), John Drummond (Newscaster), Tony Fosco (Chicago Cop #2), Joseph F. Fisher (Otto Sloan), James Liautaud (Paul), David Darlow (Dr. Lentz), Tom Galouzis (Surgeon), James F. McKinsey (Surgeon).
      Synopsis: Dr. Richard Kimble, unjustly accused of murdering his wife, must find the real killer while being the target of a nationwide manhunt.
      Comment: In this big-screen adaptation of the TV series, Ford plays Dr Richard Kimble, accused of killing his wife (Ward) in a  domestic dispute, when in fact she was murdered by a one-armed man. When Ford escapes after being convicted, US Marshal Jones is brought in to track him down, Whilst Ford tries to clear his name. This high-energy action thriller is very well directed by Davis and in Ford and Jones has two stars at the top of their game. Ford’s everyman role plays to his strengths, whilst Jones’ determined lawman is a great rival. Good use of Chicago locations and some superbly staged action sequences – notably the train crash leading to Ford’s escape – led to the film being a box-office smash and well-received by critics. Jones won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar. Based on the 1963-7 TV series created by Roy Huggins. Followed by U.S. MARSHALS (1998) and a second TV series in 2000.