Film Review – THE BRIDES OF FU MANCHU (1966)

BRIDES OF FU MANCHU, THE (1966, UK) ***
Action, Crime, Sci-Fi

dist. Anglo-Amalgamated Film Distributors (UK), Seven Arts Pictures (USA); pr co. Constantin Film Produktion / Fu Manchu Films / Hallam Productions; d. Don Sharp; w. Harry Alan Towers (as Peter Welbeck) (based on characters created by Sax Rohmer); pr. Harry Alan Towers, David Henley; ph. Ernest Steward (Eastmancolor. 35mm. Spherical. 1.85:1); m. Bruce Montgomery; ed. Allan Morrison; ad. Frank White; cos. Harry Haynes, Tina Haynes; m/up. George Partleton, Anne Box; sd. Len Abbott, John Brommage, Roy Piper (Mono (RCA Sound Recording)); rel. 2 September 1966 (West Germany), 16 December 1966 (UK/USA); cert: U; r/t. 94m.

cast: Christopher Lee (Fu Manchu), Douglas Wilmer (Nayland Smith), Heinz Drache (Franz Baumer), Marie Versini (Marie Lentz), Howard Marion-Crawford (Doctor Petrie), Tsai Chin (Lin Tang), Rupert Davies (Jules Merlin), Kenneth Fortescue (Sergeant Spicer), Joseph Fürst (Otto Lentz (as Joseph Furst)), Roger Hanin (Inspector Pierre Grimaldi), Harald Leipnitz (Nikki Sheldon), Carole Gray (Michel Merlin), Burt Kwouk (Feng), Salmaan Peerzada (Abdul (as Salmaan Peer)), Ric Young (Control Assistant (as Eric Young)), Wendy Gifford (Louise), Francesca Tu (Lotus (as Poulet Tu)), Sally Sheridan (Shiva (as Danni Sheridan)), Denis Holmes (Constable), Maureen Beck (Nurse Brown).

In 1924, Dr. Fu Manchu (Lee), his army of dacoits and his vicious daughter Lin Tang (Chin) are kidnapping the daughters of prominent scientists and taking them to his remote island, where he demands that the fathers help him to build a device that transmits blast waves through a radio transmitter, which he intends to use to take over the world. He plans to keep (even wed) the girls in question. But Dr. Fu Manchu’s archenemy, Nayland Smith (Wilmer) of Scotland Yard, is determined not to let that happen. Lee returns as the evil Fu in the decent follow-up to THE FACE OF FU MANCHU (1965). The film repeats the same formula and adds little that is new, but the direction is lively and the pace quick. The dialogue and script are strictly comic book, of course, and the performances vary in quality. Wilmer replaced Nigel Green in the role of Scotland Yard’s Nayland Smith, whilst Crawford returns as his sidekick Petrie – the pair striking up something akin to a Holmes/Watson dynamic. Chin exudes a sadistic menace as Fu’s daughter. Good location work and period detail for the limited budget. US release includes a 1m prologue reprise of the end of THE FACE OF FU MANCHU (1965). Followed by THE VENGEANCE OF FU MANCHU (1967).

Film Review – THE MASK OF FU MANCHU (1932)

Pre Code Confidential #4: Boris Karloff in THE MASK OF FU MANCHU ...THE MASK OF FU MANCHU (USA, 1932) ***½
      Distributor: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM); Production Company: Cosmopolitan Productions / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) ; Release Date: 5 November 1932 (USA), 24 November 1932 (UK); Filming Dates: 6 August 1932 – 21 October 1932; Running Time: 68m; Colour: B&W; Sound Mix: Mono (Western Electric Sound System); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Director: Charles Brabin; Writer: Irene Kuhn, Edgar Allan Woolf, John Willard (based on the novel by Sax Rohmer); Director of Photography: Tony Gaudio; Music Composer: William Axt (uncredited); Film Editor: Ben Lewis; Art Director: Cedric Gibbons; Costumes: Adrian; Make-up: Cecil Holland (uncredited); Sound: Douglas Shearer; Special Effects: Warren Newcombe (uncredited).
      Cast: Boris Karloff (Dr. Fu Manchu), Lewis Stone (Nayland Smith), Karen Morley (Sheila Barton), Charles Starrett (Terrence Granville), Myrna Loy (Fah Lo See), Jean Hersholt (Von Berg), Lawrence Grant (Sir Lionel Barton), David Torrence (McLeod), Everett Brown (Slave (uncredited)), Steve Clemente (Knife Thrower (uncredited)), Willie Fung (Ship’s Steward (uncredited)), Ferdinand Gottschalk (British Museum Official (uncredited)), Allen Jung (Coolie (uncredited)), Tetsu Komai (Swordsman (uncredited)), James B. Leong (Guest (uncredited)), Oswald Marshall (Undetermined Role (uncredited)), Chris-Pin Martin (Potentate (uncredited)), Lal Chand Mehra (Indian Prince (uncredited)), Edward Peil Sr. (Coolie Spy (uncredited)), Clinton Rosemond (Slave (uncredited)), C. Montague Shaw (Curator Dr. Fairgyle – British Museum Official (uncredited)), E. Alyn Warren (Goy Lo Sung – Fu Manchu Messenger (uncredited)), Olive Young (Cantina singer (uncredited)).
      Synopsis: Englishmen race to find the tomb of Ghengis Khan. They have to get there fast, as the evil genius Dr. Fu Manchu is also searching, and if he gets the mysteriously powerful relics, he and his diabolical daughter will enslave the world!
      Comment: Karloff is excellent as Sax Rohmer’s evil Dr Fu Manchu in this pre-Hays code adventure controversial for its racial overtones. Stone leads an expedition to Africa in search of the tomb of Genghis Khan to claim the sword and mask from within. Karloff seeks the treasures for his own benefit. Sumptuously designed and with torture scenes that would have pushed the censors a couple of years later, it is a fascinating adaptation of Rohmer’s simplistic story if rather leaden due to the static camerawork. Loy is deliciously treacherous as Karloff’s daughter who seduces Starrett – the pair being an obvious influence on FLASH GORDON’s Emperor Ming and Princess Aura. Charles Vidor was fired after a few days of shooting and replaced as director by Brabin. Rohmer’s original novel was serialized in Colliers between 7 May and 23 July 1932.