Film Review – AIRPORT ’77 (1977)

AIRPORT ’77 (1977, USA, 114m, PG) ***
Action, Drama, Thriller
dist. Universal Pictures; pr co. Universal Pictures; d. Jerry Jameson; w. Michael Scheff, David Spector (based on a story by H.A.L. Craig and Charles Kuenstle and the novel “Airport” by Arthur Hailey); pr. William Frye; ph. Philip H. Lathrop (Technicolor | 2.35:1); m. John Cacavas; ed. Robert Watts, J. Terry Williams; pd. George C. Webb.
cast: Jack Lemmon (Don Gallagher), Lee Grant (Karen Wallace), Brenda Vaccaro (Eve Clayton), Joseph Cotten (Nicholas St. Downs III), Olivia de Havilland (Emily Livingston), Darren McGavin (Stan Buchek), Christopher Lee (Martin Wallace), Robert Foxworth (Chambers), Robert Hooks (Eddie), George Kennedy (Joe Patroni), James Stewart (Philip Stevens), Monte Markham (Banker), Kathleen Quinlan (Julie), Gil Gerard (Frank Powers), James Booth (Ralph Crawford), Monica Lewis (Anne), Maidie Norman (Dorothy), Pamela Bellwood (Lisa), Arlene Golonka (Mrs. Jane Stern), Tom Sullivan (Steve), M. Emmet Walsh (Dr. Williams), Michael Pataki (Wilson).
The second sequel to AIRPORT also takes its lead from THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE as a botched mid-air hijack of multi-millionaire Stewart’s private 747, carrying a collection of priceless works of art, results in the plane crashing into the sea. As the stricken airliner sinks, its passengers and crew, led by pilot Lemmon, are faced with a nightmare fight for survival. Despite the far-fetched nature of its premise, the film manages to deliver a decent number of thrills. The game cast help to sell the scenario, with Lemmon and McGavin delivering convincing performances. The film does have the usual array of stock characters and their domestic baggage, but the action takes centre stage once the plane hits the water and Jameson keeps the tension high through to the finale. Network TV version added additional footage, including deleted scenes and newly shot footage, and runs 182m. Followed by THE CONCORDE… AIRPORT ’79 (1979).
AAN: Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (George C. Webb, Mickey S. Michaels); Best Costume Design (Edith Head, Burton Miller).

Film Review – THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD (1938)

THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD (1938, USA, 106m, U) *****
Action, Adventure, Romance
dist. Warner Bros.; pr co. First National Pictures / Warner Bros.; d. Michael Curtiz, William Keighley; w. Norman Reilly Raine, Seton I. Miller; pr. Hal B. Wallis, Jack L. Warner (both uncredited); ph. Tony Gaudio, Sol Polito (Technicolor | 1.37:1); m. Erich Wolfgang Korngold; ed. Ralph Dawson; ad. Carl Jules Weyl.
cast: Errol Flynn (Robin Hood), Olivia de Havilland (Maid Marian), Basil Rathbone (Sir Guy of Gisbourne), Claude Rains (Prince John), Patric Knowles (Will Scarlett), Eugene Pallette (Friar Tuck), Alan Hale (Little John), Melville Cooper (High Sheriff of Nottingham), Ian Hunter (King Richard the Lion-Heart), Una O’Connor (Bess), Herbert Mundin (Much), Montagu Love (Bishop of the Black Canons), Leonard Willey (Sir Essex), Robert Noble (Sir Ralf), Kenneth Hunter (Sir Mortimer), Robert Warwick (Sir Geoffrey), Colin Kenny (Sir Baldwin), Lester Matthews (Sir Ivor), Harry Cording (Dickon Malbete), Ivan F. Simpson (Proprietor of Kent Road Tavern).
Not only the definitive Robin Hood movie, but one of the all-time great adventure films and highly influential on George Lucas and his STAR WARS saga. When King Richard the Lionheart is captured, his scheming brother Prince John (Rains). aided by Sir Guy of Gisbourne (Rathbone), plots to reach the throne, to the outrage of Sir Robin of Locksley (Flynn), the bandit king of Sherwood Forest. Rounding up his band of men he eventually wins the support of the lovely Maid Marian (de Havilland). Filmed in three-strip Technicolor, this is a sumptuous production full of verve and pomp. Flynn is perfect as the energetic and charismatic Robin. He has the ideal cast in support, from the calculating Raines to the poise of the sadistic Rathbone and the sensitive beauty of de Havilland. The set design and matte work are first-rate for the period, whilst Dawson’s slick editing and Korngold’s boisterous score add significantly to the production. Milo Anderson’s costumes are designed to maximise the use of the Technicolor process. The climactic swordfight between Flynn and Rathbone is inventive and often hailed as one of the best filmed. Curtiz replaced Keighley as director of the film to add vigour to the action scenes. The film won 3 Oscars: Best Soundtrack, Editing and Art Direction (Carl Jules Weyl). The film was entered into the National Film Registry for its culturally, historically, or aesthetically significance in 1995.
AA: Best Art Direction (Carl Jules Weyl), Best Film Editing (Ralph Dawson), Best Music, Original Score (Erich Wolfgang Korngold)
AAN: Best Picture