TV Review – SHERWOOD (2022)

SHERWOOD (2022, UK, 6 x 60m, 15) ****
Crime, Mystery
dist. British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) (UK); pr co. House Productions; d. Lewis Arnold, Ben A. Williams w. James Graham; exec pr. Lewis Arnold, James Graham, Juliette Howell, Ben Irving, Tessa Ross, Harriet Spencer; pr. Rebecca Hodgson; ph. Sam Care, Simon Archer (Colour | 2.00:1); m sup. Catherine Grieves; ed. Sacha Szwarc, Sam White; ad. Stephanie Nicolle.
cast: David Morrissey (DCS Ian St Clair), Lesley Manville (Julie Jackson), Robert Glenister (DI Kevin Salisbury), Kevin Doyle (Fred Rowley), Claire Rushbrook (Cathy Rowley), Lorraine Ashbourne (Daphne Sparrow), Terence Maynard (DS Cleaver), Perry Fitzpatrick (Rory Sparrow), Andrea Lowe (DI Taylor), Philip Jackson (Mickey Sparrow), Clare Holman (Helen St Clair), Adam Hugill (Scott Rowley), Adeel Akhtar (Andy Fisher), Bally Gill (Neel Fisher), Nadine Marshall (Jenny Harris), Bill Jones (Ronan Sparrow), Harpal Hayer (PC Arjun Patel), Chloe Harris (PC Kirsty Dove), Safia Oakley-Green (Cinderella Jackson), Don Gilet (Jacob Harris), Mark Addy (Ron St Clair), Alun Armstrong (Gary Jackson), Stephen Tompkinson (Warnock), Lindsay Duncan (Jennifer Hale).
In this moody crime drama, seemingly patterned after the highly popular BROADCHURCH, two shocking murders shatter an already fractured community, leading to one of the largest manhunts in British history while threatening to inflame historic divisions sparked during the Miners’ Strike three decades before. Intercutting the two time periods enables writer Graham to set the character background and the story involves a large cast of highly accomplished actors. The performances of the ensemble cast are uniformly excellent The result is a largely absorbing drama that only wanders through its later episodes as establishing backstory for many of the characters takes precedence. The mystery element switches between the search for the murderer of Armstrong’s former NUM member to that of a police spy who has, unknown to the rest of the community, remained there. There are also personal dramas for most of the lead characters to deal with – notably the antagonism between detectives Morrissey and Glenister. The portrayal of a community divided by ongoing grudges carried over from the miner’s strike of 1984 is painstakingly detailed, but the finale which gathers all those characters together to have their say feels a little staged and manufactured but serves to hammer home the points.

TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: THE BATTLE OF RANSKOOR AV KOLOS (2018)

Image result for The Battle of Ranskoor Av KolosDoctor Who: The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 49m) ***  pr. Alex Mercer; d. Jamie Childs; w. Chris Chibnall; ph. Sam Heasman; m.Segun Akinola.  Cast: Jodie Whittaker, Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole, Mandip Gill, Mark Addy, Phyllis Logan, Percelle Ascott, Jan Lee, Samuel Oatley. On the planet of Ranskoor Av Kolos, lies the remains of a brutal battlefield. But as the Doctor, Graham, Yaz and Ryan answer nine separate distress calls, they discover the planet holds far more secrets. Who is the mysterious commander with no memory? What lies beyond the mists? Who or what are the Ux? The answers will lead the Doctor and her friends towards a deadly reckoning. Season finale lacks the sense of occasion of previous seasons. The story is okay, but again the alien threat is too easily nullified and there is no real sense of jeopardy as everything feels so rushed – it was a mistake (one of many) not to sprinkle some two-parters into this series. The performances are uneven, with Gill and Cole too wooden in their parts. The best performances come from Addy and Walsh. Jodie Whittaker appears to have settled into a one-tone approach to her performance as the Doctor and many of the jokey lines feel more than a little bit wearisome. It’s all nicely shot and the visuals are very impressive. The theme of “cause and effect” by tying into THE WOMAN WHO FELL TO EARTH feels tokenistic. It provides a bookend feel to the season, but there is no real sense of wonder or surprise. An average end to what has been a disappointingly average series.