Film Review – BLACK GUNN (1972)

BLACK GUNN (1972, USA/UK) **½
Action, Crime, Thriller
dist. Columbia Pictures (USA), Columbia-Warner Distributors (UK); pr co. Champion Production Company; d. Robert Hartford-Davis; w. Franklin Coen (based on an original screenplay by Robert Shearer and an original story by Robert Hartford-Davis); pr. John Heyman, Norman Priggen; ph. Richard H. Kline (Eastmancolor. 35mm. Spherical. 1.85:1); m. Tony Osborne; ed. Pat Somerset; ad. Jack De Shields; rel. 20 December 1972 (USA); BBFC cert: 18; r/t. 96m.
cast: Jim Brown (Gunn), Martin Landau (Capelli), Brenda Sykes (Judith), Luciana Paluzzi (Toni), Vida Blue (Sam Green), Stephen McNally (Laurento), Keefe Brasselle (Winman), Timothy Brown (Larry), William Campbell (Rico), Bernie Casey (Seth), Gary Conway (Adams), Chuck Daniel (Mel), Tommy Davis (Webb), Rick Ferrell (Jimpy), Bruce Glover (Ray Kriley), Toni Holt Kramer (Betty), Herbert Jefferson Jr. (Scott Gunn), Jay Montgomery (Junkie), Mark Tapscott (Cassidy), Gene Washington (Elmo).
One of the many black action thrillers that followed on the coattails of SHAFT (1971) but lacked the class of that production. It is a fast-paced, but unevenly handled, action vehicle for Brown in which a black militant group robs a Mafia bookie joint and steals incriminating ledgers which, in turn, prompts retaliation from the mob. When the group’s leader, who happens to be nightclub owner Brown’s brother, is killed Brown hunts down the perpetrators. Brown is a physically effective lead but otherwise, his performance lacks charisma. Sykes brings some charm to her role as Brown’s loyal girlfriend. Landau and Paluzzi (as key mob members) are underused in a strong supporting cast. Glover, however, enjoys himself as the mob’s chief henchman. The plot is overly familiar, and the earthy dialogue is heavy on themes of the struggles of black Americans. British director Hartford-Davis’ handling of the material is occasionally unfocused with jarring camerawork hampering some otherwise bloody and lively action sequences.

Film Review – THUNDERBALL (1965)

Thunderball (1965) Review - The Action EliteTHUNDERBALL (1965, UK) ****
Action, Adventure, Thriller
dist. United Artists Corporation; pr co. Eon Productions; d. Terence Young; w. Richard Maibaum, John Hopkins (based on a story by Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham and Ian Fleming and an original screenplay by Jack Whittingham); exec pr. Albert R. Broccoli, Harry Saltzman (each uncredited); pr. Kevin McClory; ass pr. Stanley Sopel (uncredited); ph. Ted Moore (Technicolor. 35mm. Panavision (anamorphic). 2.39:1); m. John Barry; ed. Ernest Hosler; pd. Ken Adam; ad. Peter Murton; set d. Peter Lamont (uncredited); cos. Anthony Mendleson; m/up. Basil Newall, Paul Rabiger; sd. Maurice Askew, Bert Ross, Eileen Warwick (Mono (Westrex Recording System)); sfx. John Stears; vfx. Roy Field (uncredited); st. Yvan Chiffre; rel. 21 December 1965 (USA), 29 December 1965 (UK); cert: PG; r/t. 130m.

cast: Sean Connery (James Bond), Claudine Auger (Dominique ‘Domino’ Derval), Adolfo Celi (Emilio Largo), Luciana Paluzzi (Fiona Volpe), Rik Van Nutter (Felix Leiter), Guy Doleman (Count Lippe), Molly Peters (Patricia Fearing), Martine Beswick (Paula Caplan), Bernard Lee (‘M’), Desmond Llewelyn (‘Q’), Lois Maxwell (Moneypenny), Roland Culver (Home Secretary), Earl Cameron (Pinder Romania), Paul Stassino (Angelo Palazzi / Major François Duval), Rose Alba (Madame Bouvar), Philip Locke (Vargas), George Pravda (Pofessor Ladislaw Kutze), Michael Brennan (Janni), Leonard Sachs (Group Captain Pritchard), Edward Underdown (SIr John – Air Marshal), Reginald Beckwith (Kenniston), Harold Sanderson (Hydrofoil Captain).

When a British Vulcan bomber is stolen with two atomic bombs on board. S.P.E.C.T.R.E. announce that they have the plane and will detonate the bombs unless one hundred million dollars worth of uncut diamonds are delivered. James Bond (Connery) tracks the plane down to the Bahamas but still has to deal with the deadly Emilio Largo (Celi). This was the biggest Bond film of the 1960s and is one of the best. Connery is at the height of his game here and the story has a scale that is larger than any of the previous entries. The underwater sequences may tend toward the slow side, but on the whole the story moves along at a good clip and is well edited. The humour is more evident, but it is still kept in check. Paluzzi is one of the best Bond villainesses and her verbal and literal tussles with Connery are memorable. The Bahamas are well photographed, and the underwater staging is handled with skill by second unit director Ricou Browning. Followed by YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE (1967). Remade with Connery as NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN (1983).

AA: Best Effects, Special Visual Effects (John Stears).

Film Review – THUNDERBALL (1965)

Thunderball (1965; UK; Technicolor; 130m) ∗∗∗∗½  d. Terence Young; w. Richard Maibaum, John Hopkins; ph. Ted Moore; m. John Barry.  Cast: Sean Connery, Claudine Auger, Adolfo Celi, Luciana Paluzzi, Rik Van Nutter, Guy Doleman, Molly Peters, Martine Beswick, Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn, Lois Maxwell, Roland Culver, Earl Cameron, Paul Stassino, Rose Alba, Philip Locke. James Bond heads to The Bahamas to recover two nuclear warheads stolen by SPECTRE agent Emilio Largo in an international extortion scheme. The biggest Bond film of the 60s is one of the best. Connery is at the height of his game here and the story has a scale that is larger than any of the previous entries. The humour is more evident, but still kept in check and Paluzzi is one of the best ever Bond villainesses. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming, which itself was based on a story by Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham and Ian Fleming [PG]