Film Review – FORCE 10 FROM NAVARONE (1978)

Force 10 from Navarone (1978) - Photo Gallery - IMDbFORCE 10 FROM NAVARONE (1978, UK) **½
Action, Drama, War
dist. Columbia-Warner Distributors (UK), American International Pictures (AIP) (USA); pr co. Columbia Pictures Corporation  / Navarone Productions; d. Guy Hamilton; w. Robin Chapman, Carl Foreman (based on the novel by Alistair MacLean); exec pr. Carl Foreman; pr. Oliver A. Unger; ass pr. David W. Orton; ph. Christopher Challis (Technicolor. 35mm. Panavision (anamorphic). 2.39:1); m. Ron Goodwin; ed. Raymond Poulton; pd. Geoffrey Drake; ad. Fred Carter; cos. Emma Porteous; m/up. Peter Robb-King, Colin Jamison; sd. Dino Di Campo, Derek Holding, William Trent (4-Track Stereo); sfx. René Albouze, Giuseppe Carozza, Peter Hutchinson; vfx. Geoffrey Drake; st. Eddie Stacey; rel. 16 August 1978 (Spain), 7 December 1978 (UK), 8 December 1978 (USA); cert: PG/15; r/t. 118m.

cast: Robert Shaw (Mallory), Harrison Ford (Barnsby), Barbara Bach (Maritza), Edward Fox (Miller), Franco Nero (Lescovar), Carl Weathers (Weaver), Richard Kiel (Drazak), Alan Badel (Petrovitch), Michael Byrne (Schroeder), Philip Latham (Jensen), Angus MacInnes (Reynolds), Michael Sheard (Sgt. Bauer), Petar Buntic (Marko), Leslie Schofield (Interrogation Officer 1), Anthony Langdon (Interrogation Officer 2), Richard Hampton (Interrogation Officer 3), Paul Humpoletz (Sgt. Bismark), Dicken Ashworth (Nolan), Christopher Malcolm (Rogers), Nick Ellsworth (Salvone).

This is an at times lacklustre sequel to the 1961 hit THE GUNS OF NAVARONE. Here Shaw and Fox, taking on the roles vacated by Gregory Peck and David Niven, are assigned to assassinate a German spy who has infiltrated a resistance unit in Yugoslavia. They are unwanted passengers on Ford’s mission to blow up a bridge as the two missions become entwined. Much of the fun of this film is in the banter between Shaw and Fox and their interactions with Ford’s crack squad. The plot is a little stale and recalls earlier better films – not least the film on which this sequel is based. Hamilton’s direction feels workmanlike and unimaginative and his early use of stock footage jars – some of it is even in black and white. The acting is mixed, with Shaw, Ford and Fox the standouts, whilst Bach is awfully miscast. Kiel does well in his rebel leader role as does Weathers as an escaped prisoner who gets involved with the mission. Nero’s performance as the potential spy lacks depth. The production uses the location scenery to good advantage, but there is a lack of the bigger picture of a war taking place – it all feels too naturally beautiful and unspoiled. the result is an adequate, but ultimately disappointing sequel that is only of interest to fans of the original and the lead actors. It was originally intended the film be made in 1967, but it was reportedly deemed that Peck and Niven were too old to reprise their roles as Mallory and Miller. Alistair MacLean adapted his original screenplay into the novel he published in 1968. Some of Robert Shaw’s lines were dubbed, as the actor died before post-production had finished. This was the last film Shaw completed. He would die during the making of AVALANCHE EXPRESS (1979). The restored/extended version runs 126m.

Film Review – THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (1974)

Related imageTHE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (UK, 1974) ***
      Distributor: United Artists Corporation; Production Company: Eon Productions; Release Date: 19 December 1974; Filming Dates: 18 April 1974 – 23 August 1974; Running Time: 125m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono | 3 Channel Stereo (London premiere print); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1; BBFC Cert: PG – Contains moderate violence.
      Director: Guy Hamilton; Writer: Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz (based on the novel by Ian Fleming); Producer: Albert R. Broccoli, Harry Saltzman; Associate Producer: Charles Orme; Director of Photography: Ted Moore, Oswald Morris; Music Composer: John Barry; Film Editor: Raymond Poulton, John Shirley; Casting Director: Weston Drury Jr., Maude Spector; Production Designer: Peter Murton; Art Director: John Graysmark, Peter Lamont; Costumes: Elsa Fennell; Make-up: Paul Engelen; Sound: Gordon Everett; Special Effects: John Stears; Visual Effects: Roy Field (uncredited).
      Cast: Roger Moore (James Bond), Christopher Lee (Scaramanga), Britt Ekland (Goodnight), Maud Adams (Andrea Anders), Hervé Villechaize (Nick Nack), Clifton James (J.W. Pepper), Richard Loo (Hai Fat), Soon-Tek Oh (Hip), Marc Lawrence (Rodney), Bernard Lee (‘M’), Lois Maxwell (Moneypenny), Marne Maitland (Lazar), Desmond Llewelyn (‘Q’), James Cossins (Colthorpe), Yao Lin Chen (Chula), Carmen Du Sautoy (Saida), Gerald James (Frazier), Michael Osborne (Naval Lieutenant), Michael Fleming (Communications Officer).
      Synopsis: Bond is led to believe that he is targeted by the world’s most expensive assassin and must hunt him down to stop him.
      Comment: Moore’s second outing as 007 starts well, with little reliance on gadgets, but later descends into increasingly outlandish set-pieces – Lee’s flying car being a particular low point. Lee actually makes for a strong villain and Villechaize a memorable henchman, but the plot is lacking in any wider threat than that to Bond himself – the climate crisis theme of the subplot maybe even more topical today but is treated here in a tokenistic way. Again, cashing in on cinematic trends of the day the film shifts locale from that in  Fleming’s novel (Jamaica) to the Far East – introducing elements of martial arts to cash in on the then-recent glut of movies inspired by Bruce Lee. The fun-house scenes that bookend the film are well shot and tense and it’s nice to see Barry return to score the films – even if the theme song is one of the series’ poorest. There are elements of the vintage Bond classics here but too often they are undermined by an increasing desire to be cute – witness the impressive car jump stunt which is totally weakened by a supposedly humorous sound effect – worse was to follow in later entries. Followed by THE SPY WHO LOVED ME (1977).