TV Movie Review – McCLOUD: ENCOUNTER WITH ARIES (1971)

McCloud : Encounter with Aries (1971) - Russ Mayberry | Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related | AllMovieMcCLOUD: ENCOUNTER WITH ARIES (TV) (1971, USA) ***½
Crime, Drama, Mystery
Network: NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY (NBC) (USA); production company: UNIVERSAL TELEVISION; director: RUSS MAYBERRY; writer: PETER ALLAN FIELDS; producer: DEAN HARGROVE; associate producer: PETER ALLAN FIELDS; director of photography: WILLIAM MARGULIES (Technicolor | 35mm | Spherical | 1.37:1); music: DICK DEBENEDICTIS; film editor: BYRON ‘BUZZ’ BRANDT; art director: WILLIAM H. TUNTKE; set decorator: JOSEPH J. STONE; costumes: GRADY HUNT; sound: EDWIN S. HALL (Mono); broadcast date: 22 SEPTEMBER 1971 (USA); BBFC cert: PG; running time: 76 MINS.
Cast: DENNIS WEAVER (Sam McCloud), J.D. CANNON (Peter B. Clifford), SEBASTIAN CABOT (Sidney Cantrell), PETER HASKELL (Richard Stevens), SUSAN STRASBERG (Lorraine), LOUISE LATHAM (Emily Cantrell), ALAN OPPENHEIMER (Mervin Simmons), TERRY CARTER (Det. Joe Broadhurst), ROBERT HOGAN (Detective Finnegan), JILL JARESS (Gloria), BOOTH COLMAN (Hines), WOODROW PARFREY (Elmer), ELISHA COOK JR. (Mr. Rafer), FORREST LEWIS (Old Man), FRED HOLLIDAY (Intern), ELIZABETH LANE (Nurse), ATHENA LORDE (Floor Nurse), NANCY JERIS (Marie), JAMES GAVIN (Policeman).
The kidnapping of a woman (Latham) who is married to a wealthy astrologer (Cabot) — and the appearance of her kidnapper (Haskell), who claims she is being held in a room with a ticking time bomb — spur the woman’s husband to bash in the kidnapper’s head with a vase. This leaves McCloud (Weaver) with a limited time to determine where the woman is and who is really behind the kidnapping. This was the first episode following the transition of McCloud from its one-hour slot as part of the Four-in-One wheel to a regular rotation as part of the NBC Mystery Movie series. The story is a strong one with elements of mystery and humour. By now the role of McCloud fits the charming Weaver as well as his cowboy boots and his sparring with Cannon is always a joy to watch. A good script by Fields, tight direction from Mayberry and the casting of Cabot as the astrologer also help make this an above average mystery movie.

Film Review – SHANE (1953)

Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur, Brandon De Wilde, Van Heflin, and Jack Palance in Shane (1953)SHANE (USA, 1953) *****
      Distributor: Paramount Pictures (USA), Paramount British Pictures (UK); Production Company: Paramount Pictures Corporation; Release Date: 23 April 1953 (USA), 4 September 1953 (UK); Filming Dates: July 1951 – 16 October 1951; Running Time: 118m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono (Western Electric Recording) | 3 Channel Stereo (Western Electric Recording); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1/1.66:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Director: George Stevens; Writer: A.B. Guthrie Jr., Jack Sher (based on the novel by Jack Schaefer); Producer: George Stevens; Associate Producer: Ivan Moffat; Director of Photography: Loyal Griggs; Music Composer: Victor Young; Film Editor: William Hornbeck, Tom McAdoo; Art Director: Hal Pereira, Walter H. Tyler; Set Decorator: Emile Kuri; Costumes: Edith Head; Make-up: Wally Westmore; Sound: Gene Garvin, Harry Lindgren.
      Cast: Alan Ladd (Shane), Jean Arthur (Marian Starrett), Van Heflin (Joe Starrett), Brandon De Wilde (Joey Starrett), Jack Palance (Jack Wilson), Ben Johnson (Chris Calloway), Edgar Buchanan (Fred Lewis), Emile Meyer (Rufus Ryker), Elisha Cook Jr. (Stonewall Torrey), Douglas Spencer (Axel ‘Swede’ Shipstead), John Dierkes (Morgan Ryker), Ellen Corby (Mrs. Liz Torrey), Paul McVey (Sam Grafton), John Miller (Will Atkey – Bartender), Edith Evanson (Mrs. Shipstead), Leonard Strong (Ernie Wright), Ray Spiker (Axel Johnson – Homesteader), Janice Carroll (Susan Lewis), Martin Mason (Ed Howells), Helen Brown (Martha Lewis), Nancy Kulp (Mrs. Howells).
      Synopsis: A weary gunfighter attempts to settle down with a homestead family, but a smouldering settler/rancher conflict forces him to act.
      Comment: All-time classic Western is also one of the best films ever made. Stevens fashions a visual treat utilising the skills of cinematographer Griggs capturing the splendour of the Wyoming landscapes of vast flat valleys and steep mountains. Stevens uses the changing weather to add tone and mood to support each scene and set-piece. He also gets wonderful performances from the cast. Ladd as the mysterious Shane, who is idolised by a remarkable De Wilde, Heflin and Arthur as the farmers Ladd helps against rancher Meyer who is trying to run the farmers off his range. Palance is the embodiment of villainous cool as the hired gunfighter with a reputation. The story builds in tension towards the inevitable showdown climax. But it’s the sub-texts beneath the standard plot that make this stand out as a true classic – from DeWilde’s hero-worship idealism of Ladd’s flawed character to the unspoken conflict of feelings Arthur has between Ladd and her husband Heflin. It’s all delivered with fine nuance and sincere conviction and embellished by an evocative score from Young.
      Notes: Won an Oscar for Best Cinematography. Final film of Jean Arthur. Followed by a TV series (1966) with David Carradine in the title role.