Film Review – TWO-MINUTE WARNING (1976)

TWO-MINUTE WARNING (1976, USA) ***
Crime, Mystery, Thriller

dist. Universal Pictures (USA), Cinema International Corporation (CIC) (UK); pr co. Filmways Pictures / Universal Pictures; d. Larry Peerce; w. Edward Hume (based on the novel by George LaFountaine); pr. Edward S. Feldman; ph. Gerald Hirschfeld (Technicolor. Super 8 (Cineavision: 2.35, anamorphic), 35mm. Panavision (anamorphic). 2.35:1); m. Charles Fox; ed. Walter Hannemann, Eve Newman; ad. Herman A. Blumenthal; set d. John M. Dwyer; cos. Irwin Rose, Vicki Sánchez; m/up. Lon Bentley, Tony Lloyd, Connie Nichols; sd. James R. Alexander, Gordon Ecker, Robert L. Hoyt (Mono (Westrex Recording System)); sfx. Arthur Brewer; vfx. Albert Whitlock; st. Glenn R. Wilder; rel. 12 November 1976 (USA), November 1976 (UK); cert: R/15; r/t. 115m.

cast: Charlton Heston (Capt. Peter Holly), John Cassavetes (Sgt. Button), Martin Balsam (Sam McKeever), Beau Bridges (Mike Ramsay), Marilyn Hassett (Lucy), David Janssen (Steve), Jack Klugman (Sandman), Gena Rowlands (Janet), Walter Pidgeon (The Pickpocket), Brock Peters (Paul), David Groh (Al), Mitchell Ryan (The Priest), Joe Kapp (Charlie Tyler), Pamela Bellwood (Peggy Ramsay), Jon Korkes (Jeffrey), William Bryant (Lt. Calloway), Allan Miller (Mr. Green), Andy Sidaris (TV Director), Ron Sheldon (Assistant TV Director), Stanford Blum (Assistant TV Director).

Peerce directed this story of a mad sniper loose in a football stadium. The Los Angeles Police Department, led by Capt. Peter Holly (Heston), learns that a madman is planning to open fire on football fans in a packed Los Angeles Coliseum. Holly finds himself at tactical odds with SWAT commander Sgt. Button (Cassavetes) as the fans — including gambler Sandman (Klugman), a pickpocket (Pidgeon), car salesman Steve (Janssen) and his girlfriend, Janet (Rowlands) — unknowingly risk their lives while the gunman takes aim. Peerce handles the material skilfully – notably during the chaotic climax as the crowd stampede for the exits.  Heston gives a square-jawed performance as the police captain and Cassavetes is perhaps overly-cynical as the SWAT team leader. The supporting cast of potential sniper victims is strong, although the dialogue they are given to work with is formulaic. The football stadium scenes are well staged – the game footage for the full stadium shots of the L.A. Coliseum were from a Pac-8 college match. Script-wise, there are lapses in logic in the police approach to the situation and it is hard to believe that only one member of the crowd seems to have noticed what is going on. The gunman is given no back story, which to an extent makes the scenario more unsettling and is resonant today in representing a society where the gun laws result in frequent single-handed multi-victim shooting incidents. The back story element was later rectified in the 1979 TV broadcast version of the film, which included  around 40m of new scenes substituting 30m of the original material. Additional cast members for the TV version included: Rossano Brazzi, James Olson, Paul Shenar, William Prince, Joanna Pettet, and Warren Miller. Peerce wisely asked for his name to be removed from the credits of the new version.

AAN: Best Film Editing (Eve Newman, Walter Hannemann)

Film Review – THE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO (TV) (1972)

The Streets of San Francisco: The Pilot | Not The Baseball PitcherTHE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO (TV) (1972, USA) ***
Action, Crime, Drama, Mystery
dist. American Broadcasting Company (ABC); pr co. Quinn Martin Productions (QM) / Warner Bros. Television; d. Walter Grauman; w. Edward Hume (based on the novel “Poor, Poor Ophelia” by Carolyn Weston); exec pr. Quinn Martin; pr. Arthur Fellows, Adrian Samish; ass pr. Howard P. Alston; ph. William W. Spencer (Colour. 35mm. Spherical. 1.33:1); m. Patrick Williams; m sup. John Elizalde; ed. Richard K. Brockway; ad. Richard Y. Haman; set d. Hoyle Barrett; cos. Edward McDermott, Paula Giokaris; m/up. Don Schoenfeld, Annabell Levy; sd. Ray Barons, Bill Phillips (Mono); rel. 16 September 1972 (USA), 19 November 1973 (UK); cert: PG; r/t. 98m.

cast: Karl Malden (Detective Lt. Mike Stone), Robert Wagner (David J. Farr), Michael Douglas (Inspector Steve Keller), Andrew Duggan (Capt. A.R. Malone), Tom Bosley (Saretti), John Rubinstein (Lindy), Carmen Mathews (Sally Caswell), Edward Andrews (Joe Caswell), Lawrence Dobkin (Gregory Praxas), Kim Darby (Holly Jean Berry), Brad David (Del Berry), Mako (Kenji), Naomi Stevens (Mrs. Saretti), Lou Frizzell (Lou), Bill Quinn (Medical Examiner), Richard Brian Harris (Auto Mechanic), William Swan (Larry Pyle), Victor Millan (Tony – Detective), June Vincent (Diana), Robert Mandan (Dockmaster).

SFPD Detective Lieutenant Michael Stone (Malden) is partnered with a young college-educated Inspector, Steven Keller (Douglas), as they investigate a girl found dead in the water with a lawyer (Wagner) she knew as the primary suspect. Introductory film for the TV series that ran for five seasons from 1972-7. The film benefits from extensive location work and the instant chemistry between leads Malden and Douglas. The mystery is adapted from a novel by Carolyn Weston, which featured different lead characters. Wagner is the chief suspect as the slimy lawyer who became involved with the dead girl (played in flashback by Darby). Dobkin also gives a notable performance as an eccentric former movie star. The material is handled a little flatly by Graumann but is tightly edited and contains a memorable theme from composer Williams. Followed twenty years later by BACK TO THE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO (1992).

Film Review – CANNON (TV) (1971)

Cannon: Season One, Volume One : DVD Talk Review of the DVD VideoCANNON (TV) (1971, USA) ***
Action, Crime, Mystery, Drama
dist. Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS); pr co. Quinn Martin Productions / Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS); d. George McCowan; w. Edward Hume; exec pr. Quinn Martin; pr. Arthur Fellows, Adrian Samish; ass pr. Howard P. Alston; ph. John A. Alonzo (Colour. 35mm. Spherical. 1.33:1); m. John Carl Parker; ed. Jerry Young; ad. Philip Barber; set d. Ray Molyneaux; cos. Dorothy H. Rodgers, Eric Seelig; m/up. Richard Cobos, Gloria Montemayor; sd. Robert J. Miller (Mono (Westrex Recording System)); rel. 26 March 1971 (USA), 21 October 1972 (UK); cert: PG; r/t. 98m.

cast: William Conrad (Frank Cannon), J.D. Cannon (Lt. Kelly Redfield), Lynda Day George (Christie Redfield), Murray Hamilton (Virgil Holley), Earl Holliman (Magruder), Vera Miles (Diana Langston), Barry Sullivan (Calhoun), Keenan Wynn (Eddie), Lynne Marta (Trudy Hewett), Norman Alden (Mitchell), Ellen Corby (Teacher), John Fiedler (Jake), Lawrence Pressman (Herb Mayer), Ross Hagen (Red Dunleavy), Robert Sorrells (Tough in Blue Moon bar), Pamela Dunlap (Laverne Holley), Jimmy Lydon (Betting Clerk), William Joyce (Ken Langston), Wayne McLaren (Jackie / T.J.).

William Conrad stars as portly private detective Frank Cannon who investigates the murder of his ex-girlfriend (Miles)’s husband and gets entangled in small-town corruption. This is the pilot for the long-running series, which ran for five seasons from 1972-76. The story may be a standard mystery, but Conrad’s colourful performance and a strong guest cast make it an enjoyable movie. McCowan directs with some flair and adds a gritty realism through his frequent use of hand-held camera. A reunion movie THE RETURN OF FRANK CANNON (1980) appeared later.