Film Review – NON-STOP (2014)

NON-STOP (2014, USA/UK/France, 106m, 12) **½
Action, Mystery, Thriller
dist. Universal Pictures (USA), StudioCanal (UK); pr co. StudioCanal / Silver Pictures; d. Jaume Collet-Serra; w. Christopher Roach, John W. Richardson, Ryan Engle (based on a story by John W. Richardson & Christopher Roach); pr. Alex Heineman, Andrew Rona, Joel Silver; ph. Flavio Martínez Labiano (Technicolor | 2.35:1); m. John Ottman; ed. Jim May; pd. Alec Hammond; ad. David Swayze.
cast: Liam Neeson (Bill Marks), Julianne Moore (Jen Summers), Scoot McNairy (Tom Bowen), Michelle Dockery (Nancy), Nate Parker (Zack White), Corey Stoll (Austin Reilly), Lupita Nyong’o (Gwen), Omar Metwally (Dr. Fahim Nasir), Jason Butler Harner (Kyle Rice), Linus Roache (David McMillan), Shea Whigham (Agent Marenick), Anson Mount (Jack Hammond), Quinn McColgan (Becca), Corey Hawkins (Travis Mitchell), Frank Deal (Charles Wheeler), Bar Paly (Iris Marianne), Edoardo Costa (Herve Philbert), Jon Abrahams (David Norton), Amanda Quaid (Emily Norton), Beth Dixon (Older Woman).
Ludicrous but fast-paced action thriller vehicle for Neeson. Here he plays a washed-out Air Marshal who boards a transatlantic flight bound from New York City to London. During the flight, he becomes the recipient of text messages demanding the American government deposit $150 million into an offshore bank account or his fellow passengers will be killed off one-by-one every twenty minutes. What starts off as an initially intriguing idea is wasted by a script that defies logic and character actions and interactions that frequently feel unreal. Neeson lends the proceedings some gravitas through an honest performance and is supported well by Moore, as a cooky passenger who has faith in Neeson. However, the finale stretches credulity beyond breaking point and is hampered by poor visual effects leaving the viewing experience an ultimately disappointing one.

Film Review – FIRST MAN (2018)

First Man (2018) — The Movie Database (TMDb)FIRST MAN (2018, USA) ****
Drama, Biography
dist. Universal Pictures (USA), Universal Pictures International (UPI) (UK); pr co. Universal Pictures / DreamWorks SKG / Temple Hill Entertainment / Perfect World Pictures; d. Damien Chazelle; w. Nicole Perlman, Josh Singer (based on the book by James R. Hansen); exec pr. Adam Merims, Josh Singer, Steven Spielberg; pr. Marty Bowen, Damien Chazelle, Wyck Godfrey, Isaac Klausner; ass pr. Kevin Elam; ph. Linus Sandgren (Colour. D-Cinema. Digital Intermediate (2K). 2.39:1); m. Justin Hurwitz; ed. Tom Cross; pd. Nathan Crowley; ad. Erik Osusky; set d. Kathy Lucas; cos. Mary Zophres; m/up. Katelyn Barton, Marie Larkin; sd. Mildred Iatrou, Lee Gilmore, Nia Hansen, Phil Barrie (Dolby Atmos | DTS (DTS: X) | Auro 11.1); sfx. J.D. Schwalm; vfx. Radley Teruel, Paul Lambert, Josh Dagg; st. Nick Brandon, James M. Churchman; rel. 29 August 2018 (Italy), 31 August 2018 (USA), 12 October 2018 (UK); cert: 12; r/t. 141m.

cast: Ryan Gosling (Neil Armstrong), Claire Foy (Janet Armstrong), Jason Clarke (Ed White), Kyle Chandler (Deke Slayton), Corey Stoll (Buzz Aldrin), Patrick Fugit (Elliot See), Christopher Abbott (Dave Scott), Ciarán Hinds (Bob Gilruth), Olivia Hamilton (Pat White), Pablo Schreiber (James Lovell), Shea Whigham (Gus Grissom), Lukas Haas (Mike Collins), Ethan Embry (Pete Conrad), Brian d’Arcy James (Joe Walker), Cory Michael Smith (Roger Chaffee), Kris Rey (Marilyn See (as Kris Swanberg)), Gavin Warren (Young Rick Armstrong), Luke Winters (Older Rick Armstrong), Connor Blodgett (Mark Armstrong), Lucy Stafford (Karen Armstrong (as Lucy Brooke Stafford)).

This account of Neil Armstrong’s journey from personal tragedy, following the tragic death of his young daughter from a brain tumour in 1961, to becoming the first man to walk on the moon as the commander of Apollo 11 eight years later. The character portrait is one of an insular man who struggles to share his emotions or connect with his family. Gosling’s passive acting style is perfect for the role. The best performance comes from Foy as his increasingly alienated wife and her struggle to reach into her husband’s inner thoughts. The movie is shot in a documentary style with frequent use of hand-held camera giving a personal perspective and a high level of authenticity but creating a distanced perspective toward its characters along the way. The drama is often absorbing, despite the somewhat snapshot approach to the material. The production design is accurate, perfectly capturing the period as well as a real sense of the danger the brave astronauts put themselves in on achieving their country’s goal. Ultimately, the film shows how flawed characters can become national heroes, whilst maintaining a sense of perspective between the human and technical dramas.

AA: Best Achievement in Visual Effects (Paul Lambert, Ian Hunter, Tristan Myles, J.D. Schwalm)
AAN: Best Achievement in Sound Editing (Ai-Ling Lee, Mildred Iatrou); Best Achievement in Production Design (Nathan Crowley, Kathy Lucas); Best Achievement in Sound Mixing (Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Ai-Ling Lee, Mary H. Ellis)