TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: ARACHNIDS IN THE UK (2018)

Image result for doctor who arachnids in the ukDoctor Who: Arachnids in the UK (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 50m) ***  pr. Alex Mercer; d. Sallie Aprahamian; w. Chris Chibnall; ph. Tico Poulakakis; m.Segun Akinola.  Cast: Jodie Whittaker, Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole, Mandip Gill, Chris Noth, Shobna Gulati, Tanya Fear, Ravin J Ganatra, Bhavnisha Parmar, Jaleh Alp, William Meredith, Sharon D Clarke. The Doctor, Yaz, Graham and Ryan find their way back to Yorkshire – and Yaz’s family – only to find something is stirring amidst the eight-legged arachnid population of Sheffield. This episode is an ecological sci-fi/horror tale, which plays to the fears of arachnophobes by introducing us to toxically mutated spiders running amok. Some effective scares and jump moments are offset by a script with some unfilled holes and a performance from Noth as a Trump-like political figure that is over-the-top in the extreme. The TARDIS crew are developing nicely, however, and Walsh continues to bring warmth to his bereaved character. Whittaker is finding her feet well and overcomes some of the script’s weak dialogue with the force of her personality. The spiders are brilliantly realised by the effects team. An abrupt conclusion, which fails to explain satisfactorily how the spider threat to the city is overcome on a broader scale means this episode can at best be seen as entertaining but is undeniably dramatically flawed by overplaying its comedic elements. [PG]

TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: ROSA (2018)

Doctor Who: Rosa (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 50m) **½  pr. Nikki Wilson; d. Mark Tonderai; w. Malorie Blackman, Chris Chibnall; ph. Tico Poulakakis; m.Segun Akinola.  Cast: Jodie Whittaker, Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole, Mandip Gill, Vinette Robinson, Joshua Bowman, Trevor White, Richard Lothian, Jessica Claire Preddy, Gareth Marks, David Rubin, Ray Sesay, Aki Omoshaybi, David Dukas, Morgan Deare.  Montgomery, Alabama. 1955. The Doctor and her friends find themselves in the Deep South of America. As they encounter a seamstress by the name of Rosa Parks, they begin to wonder whether someone is attempting to change history. A well-meaning episode that boldly tackles racism in 1950s Southern USA and the moral stand that leads to the raised focus on the Civil Rights Movement is hampered by a heavy-handed script and inconsistent performances. Whittaker is still finding her feet as the Doctor whilst Robinson is excellent as the dignified Rosa, but her performance is undermined by clumsy scripting and Cole’s increasingly annoying naivety as Ryan. Bowman’s time-travelling escaped convict, Krasko, has got to be one of the series’ least convincing villains. Composer Akinola tries to add menace to the character through his foreboding score, but only succeeds in making it seem like a parody. The South African locations double well for Alabama and again the technical credits are top-notch.  The overwrought song delivered over the end titles lashes on the emotion with a trowel. With a more considered script and a stronger cast, this could have been a dramatically powerful tale, as all the elements are there, but we’re left with what feels like a missed opportunity. [12]

TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: THE GHOST MONUMENT (2018)

Doctor Who: The Ghost Monument (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 48m) ***½  pr. Nikki Wilson; d. Mark Tonderai; w. Chris Chibnall; ph. Tico Poulakakis; m.Segun Akinola.  Cast: Jodie Whittaker, Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole, Mandip Gill, Susan Lynch, Shaun Dooley, Art Malik.  Still reeling from their first encounter, can the Doctor and her new friends stay alive long enough in a hostile alien environment to solve the mystery of Desolation? And just who are Angstrom and Epzo? A perfunctory story is enhanced by excellent production values, visual effects and effective use of South African locations to create an alien environment. Whittaker continues to grow into the role of the Doctor, but her excessive crew of three companions leaves little room for individual character development and a vying for screen time. Malik is wasted in a mysterious role, whilst Lynch and Dooley do their best to bring life and motivation to their competitive characters. Whilst the storyline is refreshingly simple, it is also lacking in any real sense of peril – as the night threat is all too easily dispatched. There is promise here that the series can develop, but it will need to find space to allow its ensemble cast to breathe and develop in a format seemingly restricted to standalone episodes and a lack of two-parters, which would allow the stories and characters the requisite room. [PG]

TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: THE WOMAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (2018)

Image result for the woman who fell to earthDoctor Who: The Woman Who Fell to Earth (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 60m) ***½  pr.  Nikki Wilson; d. Jamie Childs; w. Chris Chibnall; ph. Denis Crossan; m.  Segun Akinola. Cast: Jodie Whittaker, Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole, Mandip Gill, Sharon D. Clarke, Samuel Oatley, Johnny Dixon, Amit Shah, Asha Kingsley, Janine Mellor, Asif Khan, James Thackeray, Philip Abiodun, Stephen MacKenna, Everal A Walsh.  In a South Yorkshire city, Ryan Sinclair, Yasmin Khan and Graham O’Brien are about to have their lives changed forever, as a mysterious woman, unable to remember her own name, falls from the night sky. Can they believe a word she says? And can she help solve the strange events taking place across the city? Whittaker’s debut as the first female Doctor is a refreshingly straight-forward story but lacks any real wider threat being seemingly contained to a small area around Sheffield. Whittaker acquits herself well and in her post-regenerative state is sparky and witty. Walsh, Cole and Gill look promising as future companions. The whole thing is sumptuously photographed – mostly shot at night to create a more claustrophobic atmosphere – and the score is appropriately menacing, without being overbearing. This serves to give the story a more cinematic feel. As debut stories go it ticks most of the boxes and creates a new feel for the series that is seemingly a back to basics approach and that’s not necessarily a bad thing after some of the overblown and lazily written concepts that had crept in during Steven Moffat’s tenure. That said dumbing down the show would be a mistake. A promising, if flawed opener. The episode’s title is a reference to THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH (1976) starring David Bowie. [PG]

TV Review – BROADCHURCH: SERIES 3 (2017)

Broadchurch: Series 3 (2017; UK; Colour; 8x45m) ∗∗∗½  pr. Dan Winch; d. Paul Andrew Williams (1-3, 7-8), Daniel Nettheim (4-5), Lewis Arnold (6); w. Chris Chibnall; ph. Carlos Catalan; m. Ólafur Arnalds.  Cast: David Tennant, Jodie Whittaker, Olivia Colman, Sarah Parish, Arthur Darvill, Charlotte Beaumont, Georgina Campbell, Andrew Buchan, Julie Hesmondhalgh, Chris Mason, Charlie Higson, Mark Bazeley, Lenny Henry, Julie Cox, Sebastian Armesto, Carolyn Pickles, Hannah Rae, Adam Wilson, Roy Hudd.  Trish Winterman (Hesmondhalgh) reports being raped after a party held by Jim and Cath Atwood (Bazeley and Parish) several days earlier. She was hit on the head with something and could not see who attacked her. DS Ellie Miller (Colman) and DI Alec Hardy (Tennant) are called; they determine that it was a premeditated attack rather than a crime of opportunity, leading to fears that there may be a serial rapist on the loose planning to strike again. Better than Series 2 but lagging behind Series 1 this is a disturbing story dragged over a couple of episodes too many. The investigation meanders from suspect to suspect to maintain the mystery elements before managing to eventually build the suspense toward the final reveal. In between we get long shots of characters staring into the distance over glorious coastal scenery and a couple of side plots resolving story arcs from the earlier series. It’s all well done in a calculated way. [15]