Film Review – UNKNOWN (2011)

UNKNOWN (2011, UK/Germany/France/Canada/Japan/USA, 113m, 15) **½
Action, Mystery, Thriller
dist. Warner Bros. (USA), Optimum Releasing (UK); pr co. Dark Castle Entertainment / Panda Productions Inc. / Canal+ / Horticus UK / Studio Babelsberg / StudioCanal / TF1 Films Production; d. Jaume Collet-Serra; w. Oliver Butcher, Stephen Cornwell (based on the novel “Out of My Head” by Didier Van Cauwelaert); pr. Leonard Goldberg, Andrew Rona, Joel Silver; ph. Flavio Martínez Labiano (Technicolor | 2.39:1); m. John Ottman, Alexander Rudd; ed. Timothy Alverson; pd. Richard Bridgland; ad. Andreas Olshausen.
cast: Liam Neeson (Dr. Martin Harris), Diane Kruger (Gina), January Jones (Elizabeth Harris), Aidan Quinn (Martin B), Bruno Ganz (Ernst Jürgen), Frank Langella (Rodney Cole), Sebastian Koch (Professor Bressler), Olivier Schneider (Smith), Stipe Erceg (Jones), Rainer Bock (Herr Strauss), Mido Hamada (Prince Shada), Clint Dyer (Biko), Karl Markovics (Dr. Farge), Eva Löbau (Nurse Gretchen), Helen Wiebensohn (Laurel Bressler), Merle Wiebensohn (Lily Bressler), Adnan Maral (Turkish Taxi Driver), Torsten Michaelis (Airport Taxi Driver), Rainer Sellien (Control Room Detective), Petra Hartung (Control Room Detective).
This mystery thriller becomes more concerned with staging its action sequences than with maximising the potential of its premise. After a serious car accident in Berlin, biochemist Neeson awakes to find his world in utter chaos. His wife (Jones) does not recognize him; another man is using his identity, and mysterious assassins are hunting him. With the authorities sceptical, Neeson must go it alone. When he teams up with an unlikely ally in illegal immigrant Kruger, the determined Neeson discovers the truth is more than he bargained for. This is a plot that would work exceptionally well in the hands of a master like Hitchcock. Here, however, Collett-Sera initially builds up the intrigue but resorts to action genre convention in the final act. Whilst the story may be hard to swallow, Neeson injects a level of energy and intensity that allows you to go along with it for a good portion of the running time. But ultimately the script, whilst occasionally clever, lacks finesse and the portrayal of the villains is a little heavy and obvious.