Film Review – THE VENGEANCE OF FU MANCHU (1967)

VENGEANCE OF FU MANCHU, THE (1967, UK/Ireland/West Germany/Hong Kong) **½
Action, Crime, Horror

dist. Anglo-Amalgamated Film Distributors (UK), Warner Bros./Seven Arts (USA); pr co. Constantin Film / Shaw Brothers / Terra-Filmkunst; d. Jeremy Summers; w. Harry Alan Towers (as Peter Welbeck) (based on the characters created by Sax Rohmer); pr. Harry Alan Towers; ph. John von Kotze (Eastmancolor. 35mm. Spherical. 1.66:1); m. Malcolm Lockyer; s. “The Real Me,” “Where Are the Men,” m/l. Malcolm Lockyer and Don Black (voice performed by Samantha Jones); ed. Allan Morrison; ad. Peggy Gick, Scott MacGregor; sd. Brian Marshall (Mono); rel. May 1967 (UK), Jamuary 1968 (USA); cert: PG; r/t. 91m.

cast: Christopher Lee (Fu Manchu), Tony Ferrer (Inspector Ramos), Tsai Chin (Lin Tang), Douglas Wilmer (Nayland Smith), Wolfgang Kieling (Dr. Lieberson), Suzanne Roquette (Maria), Howard Marion-Crawford (Petrie), Noel Trevarthen (Mark Weston), Horst Frank (Rudy), Peter Carsten (Kurt), Maria Rohm (Ingrid), Mona Chong (Jasmin).

Lee’s third outing as the evil Fu Manchu sees him plot the death of his nemesis Nayland Smith (Wilmer) through the highly implausible use of a surgically created double, whilst looking to hook up with crime syndicates around the world via their go-between (Frank). This entry is not as tightly directed as the first two instalments with often static and unimaginative camerawork robbing the action scenes of much of the energy Don Sharp brought to those first two films. Lee has little to do other than give orders from his throne. However, Chin is again effective as Fu’s sadistic daughter and Wilmer and Crawford continue their “Holmes/Watson” styled relationship. The supporting cast, much of which is dubbed, is less strong and some of the acting is woeful. Despite the period setting, the female characters seem to be dressed and coiffured in 1960s salons adding an anachronistic tone and losing the period colour given to Sharp’s films. That said, there are still moments to enjoy on a basic comic strip level and it remains a notch above what the series would descend into in its the final two instalments. Filmed in Hong Kong and Ireland. Followed by THE BLOOD OF FU MANCHU (1968).

Film Review – THE BRIDES OF FU MANCHU (1966)

BRIDES OF FU MANCHU, THE (1966, UK) ***
Action, Crime, Sci-Fi

dist. Anglo-Amalgamated Film Distributors (UK), Seven Arts Pictures (USA); pr co. Constantin Film Produktion / Fu Manchu Films / Hallam Productions; d. Don Sharp; w. Harry Alan Towers (as Peter Welbeck) (based on characters created by Sax Rohmer); pr. Harry Alan Towers, David Henley; ph. Ernest Steward (Eastmancolor. 35mm. Spherical. 1.85:1); m. Bruce Montgomery; ed. Allan Morrison; ad. Frank White; cos. Harry Haynes, Tina Haynes; m/up. George Partleton, Anne Box; sd. Len Abbott, John Brommage, Roy Piper (Mono (RCA Sound Recording)); rel. 2 September 1966 (West Germany), 16 December 1966 (UK/USA); cert: U; r/t. 94m.

cast: Christopher Lee (Fu Manchu), Douglas Wilmer (Nayland Smith), Heinz Drache (Franz Baumer), Marie Versini (Marie Lentz), Howard Marion-Crawford (Doctor Petrie), Tsai Chin (Lin Tang), Rupert Davies (Jules Merlin), Kenneth Fortescue (Sergeant Spicer), Joseph Fürst (Otto Lentz (as Joseph Furst)), Roger Hanin (Inspector Pierre Grimaldi), Harald Leipnitz (Nikki Sheldon), Carole Gray (Michel Merlin), Burt Kwouk (Feng), Salmaan Peerzada (Abdul (as Salmaan Peer)), Ric Young (Control Assistant (as Eric Young)), Wendy Gifford (Louise), Francesca Tu (Lotus (as Poulet Tu)), Sally Sheridan (Shiva (as Danni Sheridan)), Denis Holmes (Constable), Maureen Beck (Nurse Brown).

In 1924, Dr. Fu Manchu (Lee), his army of dacoits and his vicious daughter Lin Tang (Chin) are kidnapping the daughters of prominent scientists and taking them to his remote island, where he demands that the fathers help him to build a device that transmits blast waves through a radio transmitter, which he intends to use to take over the world. He plans to keep (even wed) the girls in question. But Dr. Fu Manchu’s archenemy, Nayland Smith (Wilmer) of Scotland Yard, is determined not to let that happen. Lee returns as the evil Fu in the decent follow-up to THE FACE OF FU MANCHU (1965). The film repeats the same formula and adds little that is new, but the direction is lively and the pace quick. The dialogue and script are strictly comic book, of course, and the performances vary in quality. Wilmer replaced Nigel Green in the role of Scotland Yard’s Nayland Smith, whilst Crawford returns as his sidekick Petrie – the pair striking up something akin to a Holmes/Watson dynamic. Chin exudes a sadistic menace as Fu’s daughter. Good location work and period detail for the limited budget. US release includes a 1m prologue reprise of the end of THE FACE OF FU MANCHU (1965). Followed by THE VENGEANCE OF FU MANCHU (1967).

Film Review – THE FACE OF FU MANCHU (1965)

FACE OF FU MANCHU, THE (1965, UK/West Germany) ***½
Action, Crime, Drama

dist. Warner-Pathé Distributors (UK), Seven Arts Pictures (USA); pr co. Hallam Productions; d. Don Sharp; w. Harry Alan Towers (as Peter Welbeck); exec pr. Oliver A. Unger (US only); pr. Harry Alan Towers (as Peter Welbeck) (based on characters created by Sax Rohmer); ph. Ernest Steward (Technicolor. 35mm. Techniscope (uncredited). 2.35:1); m. Christopher Whelen; ed. John Trumper; ad. Frank White; cos. Dorothy Edwards; m/up. Gerry Fletcher, Anne Box; sd. Ken Cameron, Fred Hughesdon (Mono (RCA Sound Recording)); rel. 6 August 1965 (West Germany, UK), 24 October 1965 (USA); cert: PG; r/t. 96m.

cast: Christopher Lee (Fu Manchu), Nigel Green (Nayland Smith), Joachim Fuchsberger (Carl Jannsen), Karin Dor (Maria Muller), James Robertson Justice (Sir Charles), Howard Marion-Crawford (Dr. Petrie), Tsai Chin (Lin Tang), Walter Rilla (Muller), Harry Brogan (Gaskell), Francesca Tu (Lotus (as Poulet Tu)), Archie O’Sullivan (Chamberlain), Edwin Richfield (Chief Magistrate), Joe Lynch (Custodian), Peter Mosbacher (Hanumon), Ric Young (Grand Lama (as Eric Young)), Deborah DeLacey (Slave Girl), Jim Norton (Mathius), Jack O’Reilly (Constable), Peter Mayock (Soldier), Aiden Grennell (Security Guard).

Faced with a crime wave involving Orientals and drugs, Nayland Smith (Green) of Scotland Yard begins to suspect that it is masterminded by Fu Manchu (Lee), although he himself witnessed the latter’s execution in China some years previously. This highly entertaining and fast-moving adventure has a spirit of the old movie serials. Sharp keeps the plot moving and directs with an enthusiastic zeal. The cast are game too and their performances carry a conviction that elevates the material. Lee is commanding as Fu Manchu and Green authoritative as Nayland Smith. The stunt work on the many fight sequences is excellent (despite the stunt doubles being a little obvious), although you must wonder about old Fu’s recruitment programme given the ineptitude of his followers. Cold and bleak Irish locations double for Tibet and the film was successful enough to spawn several sequels. Followed by THE BRIDES OF FU MANCHU (1966), THE VENGEANCE OF FU MANCHU (1967), THE BLOOD OF FU MANCHU (1968) and THE CASTLE OF FU MANCHU (1969).

Film Review – TWO-MINUTE WARNING (1976)

TWO-MINUTE WARNING (1976, USA) ***
Crime, Mystery, Thriller

dist. Universal Pictures (USA), Cinema International Corporation (CIC) (UK); pr co. Filmways Pictures / Universal Pictures; d. Larry Peerce; w. Edward Hume (based on the novel by George LaFountaine); pr. Edward S. Feldman; ph. Gerald Hirschfeld (Technicolor. Super 8 (Cineavision: 2.35, anamorphic), 35mm. Panavision (anamorphic). 2.35:1); m. Charles Fox; ed. Walter Hannemann, Eve Newman; ad. Herman A. Blumenthal; set d. John M. Dwyer; cos. Irwin Rose, Vicki Sánchez; m/up. Lon Bentley, Tony Lloyd, Connie Nichols; sd. James R. Alexander, Gordon Ecker, Robert L. Hoyt (Mono (Westrex Recording System)); sfx. Arthur Brewer; vfx. Albert Whitlock; st. Glenn R. Wilder; rel. 12 November 1976 (USA), November 1976 (UK); cert: R/15; r/t. 115m.

cast: Charlton Heston (Capt. Peter Holly), John Cassavetes (Sgt. Button), Martin Balsam (Sam McKeever), Beau Bridges (Mike Ramsay), Marilyn Hassett (Lucy), David Janssen (Steve), Jack Klugman (Sandman), Gena Rowlands (Janet), Walter Pidgeon (The Pickpocket), Brock Peters (Paul), David Groh (Al), Mitchell Ryan (The Priest), Joe Kapp (Charlie Tyler), Pamela Bellwood (Peggy Ramsay), Jon Korkes (Jeffrey), William Bryant (Lt. Calloway), Allan Miller (Mr. Green), Andy Sidaris (TV Director), Ron Sheldon (Assistant TV Director), Stanford Blum (Assistant TV Director).

Peerce directed this story of a mad sniper loose in a football stadium. The Los Angeles Police Department, led by Capt. Peter Holly (Heston), learns that a madman is planning to open fire on football fans in a packed Los Angeles Coliseum. Holly finds himself at tactical odds with SWAT commander Sgt. Button (Cassavetes) as the fans — including gambler Sandman (Klugman), a pickpocket (Pidgeon), car salesman Steve (Janssen) and his girlfriend, Janet (Rowlands) — unknowingly risk their lives while the gunman takes aim. Peerce handles the material skilfully – notably during the chaotic climax as the crowd stampede for the exits.  Heston gives a square-jawed performance as the police captain and Cassavetes is perhaps overly-cynical as the SWAT team leader. The supporting cast of potential sniper victims is strong, although the dialogue they are given to work with is formulaic. The football stadium scenes are well staged – the game footage for the full stadium shots of the L.A. Coliseum were from a Pac-8 college match. Script-wise, there are lapses in logic in the police approach to the situation and it is hard to believe that only one member of the crowd seems to have noticed what is going on. The gunman is given no back story, which to an extent makes the scenario more unsettling and is resonant today in representing a society where the gun laws result in frequent single-handed multi-victim shooting incidents. The back story element was later rectified in the 1979 TV broadcast version of the film, which included  around 40m of new scenes substituting 30m of the original material. Additional cast members for the TV version included: Rossano Brazzi, James Olson, Paul Shenar, William Prince, Joanna Pettet, and Warren Miller. Peerce wisely asked for his name to be removed from the credits of the new version.

AAN: Best Film Editing (Eve Newman, Walter Hannemann)

Film Review – THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (1947)

LADY FROM SHANGHAI, THE (1947, USA) ***½
Crime, Drama, Mystery

dist. Columbia Pictures; pr co. Mercury Productions; d. Orson Welles; w. Orson Welles (based on the novel “If I Die Before I Wake” by Sherwood King); exec pr. Harry Cohn (uncredited); pr. Orson Welles; assoc pr. William Castle, Richard Wilson; ph. Charles Lawton Jr. (B&W. 35mm. Spherical. 1.37:1); m. Heinz Roemheld; md. Morris Stoloff; ed. Viola Lawrence; ad. Sturges Carne, Stephen Goosson; set d. Wilbur Menefee, Herman N. Schoenbrun; cos. Jean Louis; m/up. Clay Campbell, Robert J. Schiffer, Helen Hunt (all uncredited); sd. Lodge Cunningham (Mono (Western Electric Recording)); sfx. Lawrence W. Butler (uncredited); rel. 24 December 1947 (France), 7 March 1948 (UK), 14 April 1948 (USA); cert: -/PG; r/t. 87m.

cast: Rita Hayworth (Elsa Bannister), Orson Welles (Michael O’Hara), Everett Sloane (Arthur Bannister), Glenn Anders (George Grisby), Ted de Corsia (Sidney Broome), Erskine Sanford (Judge), Gus Schilling (Goldie), Carl Frank (District Attorney Galloway), Louis Merrill (Jake Bjornsen), Evelyn Ellis (Bessie), Harry Shannon (Cab Driver).

Michael O’Hara (Welles), an Irish adventurer, is lured by Elsa Bannister (Hayworth), beautiful wife of a crippled but successful lawyer (Sloane), into joining the crew of her husband’s yacht bound for a cruise in the Pacific. Bannister’s partner, Grisby (Anders), joins the party and offers O’Hara five thousand dollars to help him frame a disappearance act intended to look like murder. O’Hara accepts, hoping the money will enable him to get Elsa away from her husband. As you would come to expect from Welles the director, the film is full of technical brilliance and is visually stunning. Of the memorable scenes the funhouse finale is the most iconic and has been copied numerous times since. The performances are excellent with Welles convincingly affecting an Irish accent and Hayworth at her alluring best. Sloane and Arden are both sinister and on the verge of being unhinged. The bizarre story, however, must rely on the film’s technical virtues to paper over its implausibility. The script therefore, despite its adventurous and sometimes witty approach, is the weak link that prevents the film from being an out and out classic. That does not mean there is not much to enjoy in this experimental noir, just do not expect it to hang together as a whole. Welles’ original rough cut of this picture ran 155m.

Film Review – CRIMSON TIDE (1995)

CRIMSON TIDE (1995, USA) ***½
Action, Drama, Thriller
dist. Buena Vista Pictures; pr co. Hollywood Pictures / Don Simpson-Jerry Bruckheimer Films; d. Tony Scott; w. Michael Schiffer (based on a story by Michael Schiffer and Richard P. Henrick); exec pr. Lucas Foster, Mike Moder, Bill Unger; pr. Jerry Bruckheimer, Don Simpson; assoc pr. James W. Skotchdopole; ph. Dariusz Wolski (Technicolor. 35mm (Eastman). Panavision (anamorphic). 2.39:1); m. Hans Zimmer; ed. Chris Lebenzon; pd. Michael White; ad. James J. Murakami, Dianne Wager, Donald B. Woodruff; set d. Mickey S. Michaels; cos. George L. Little; m/up. Ellen Wong, Ron Scott, Michael Mills; sd. George Watters II, John P. Fasal, William B. Kaplan (Dolby Digital); sfx. Al Di Sarro, Darrell Pritchett; vfx. Hoyt Yeatman; st. Steve Picerni; rel. 12 May 1995 (USA), 3 November 1995 (UK); cert: R/15; r/t. 116m.

cast: Denzel Washington (Hunter), Gene Hackman (Ramsey), Matt Craven (Zimmer), George Dzundza (Cob), Viggo Mortensen (Weps), James Gandolfini (Lt. Bobby Dougherty), Rocky Carroll (Lt. Westergaurd), Jaime Gomez (Ood Mahoney), Michael Milhoan (Hunsicker), Scott Burkholder (TSO Billy Linkletter), Danny Nucci (Danny Rivetti), Lillo Brancato (Russell Vossler), Eric Bruskotter (Bennefield), Ricky Schroder (Lt. Paul Hellerman), Steve Zahn (William Barnes), James Lesure (Guard #2), Trevor St. John (Launcher), Dennis Garber (Fire Control Technician), Matthew Barry (Planesman), Christopher Birt (Helmsman).

After the Cold War, a breakaway Russian republic with nuclear warheads becomes a possible worldwide threat. U.S. submarine Capt. Frank Ramsey (Hackman) signs on a relatively green but highly recommended Lt. Cmdr. Ron Hunter (Washington) to the USS Alabama, which may be the only ship able to stop a possible Armageddon. When Ramsay insists that the Alabama must act aggressively, Hunter, fearing they will start rather than stop a disaster, leads a potential mutiny to stop him. Despite its implausible concept, Scott turns out a tense battle of wills between Hackman and Washington. The premise is contrived to build a debate around these men’s opposing views on military procedure and ethics. Their opposing arguments are made intelligently in the first half of the movie, but once a “mutiny” has been triggered the debate is seemingly resolved by the scriptwriters before the final act is played out. This moves the story into a more familiar race against the clock scenario, which plays out in predictable fashion.  What carries the film along, despite its flaws, are the compelling performances of its two stars who are perfectly cast. The tension remains high throughout and the technical attributes are first class. Scott avoids his penchant for showy visuals and concentrates on letting his camera capture the nuances in the performances of his lead actors. Quentin Tarantino and Robert Towne both contributed to the screenplay without credit. Extended version runs to 123m.

AAN: Best Sound (Kevin O’Connell, Rick Kline, Gregory H. Watkins, William B. Kaplan); Best Film Editing (Chris Lebenzon); Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing (George Watters II)

Film Review – ANGEL FACE (1953)

ANGEL FACE (1953, USA) ***½
Crime, Drama, Romance
dist. RKO Radio Pictures; pr co. RKO Radio Pictures; d. Otto Preminger; w. Frank S. Nugent, Oscar Millard (based on a story by Chester Erskine); exec pr. Howard Hughes (presenter); pr. Otto Preminger; ph. Harry Stradling Sr. (B&W. 35mm. Spherical. 1.37:1); m. Dimitri Tiomkin; ed. Frederic Knudtson; ad. Carroll Clark, Albert S. D’Agostino; set d. Jack Mills, Darrell Silvera; cos. Michael Woulfe; m/up. Mel Berns, Larry Germain; sd. Clem Portman, Earl A. Wolcott (Mono (RCA Sound System)); rel. 2 January 1953 (UK), 4 February 1953 (USA); cert: PG; r/t. 91m.

cast: Robert Mitchum (Frank Jessup), Jean Simmons (Diane Tremayne Jessup), Mona Freeman (Mary Wilton), Herbert Marshall (Mr. Charles Tremayne), Leon Ames (Fred Barrett), Barbara O’Neil (Mrs. Catherine Tremayne), Kenneth Tobey (Bill Crompton), Raymond Greenleaf (Arthur Vance), Griff Barnett (The Judge), Robert Gist (Miller), Morgan Farley (Juror), Jim Backus (District Attorney Judson).

Beautiful Diane Tremayne (Simmons) is a sophisticated, wealthy young woman capable of manipulating anyone who crosses her path. She also has a dark side she manages to conceal behind her appearance and her good manners. Soon after the untimely death of her stepmother (O’Neil), Diane pursues handsome Frank Jessup (Mitchum). Before long, she starts to win him over — but Frank quickly suspects that the manic Diane had more to do with her stepmother’s death than she lets on. This hastily filmed noir melodrama echoes the work of James M. Cain in its plot device of the beautiful and manipulative girl and the sap whose strings she pulls. The hasty production schedule (due to the impending expiration of Simmons’ contract with Howard Hughes) is occasionally evident in this otherwise top-draw drama. The plot unfolds quickly – a little too quickly at times – helping to gloss over some of the more implausible moments. Simmons and Mitchum are both excellent with Simmons playing her role with subtle ambiguity, thereby keeping us guessing as to her true motives. Mitchum is at his laconic best as the self-centred driver who cannot help himself. The staging is standard for the most part, but Preminger does extract all he can from both the cast and the story, whilst Tiomkin’s score perfectly captures the mood. The finale may ultimately be predictable, but the performances manage to keep you second-guessing yourself.

Film Review – THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (2017)

GREATEST SHOWMAN, THE (2017, USA) **½
Biography, Drama, Musical
dist. Twentieth Century Fox; pr co. Bona Film Group / Chernin Entertainment / TSG Entertainment / Twentieth Century Fox; d. Michael Gracey; w. Jenny Bicks, Bill Condon (based on a story by Jenny Bicks); exec pr. Tonia Davis, Donald J. Lee Jr., James Mangold; pr. Peter Chernin, Laurence Mark, Jenno Topping; ph. Seamus McGarvey (Colour. D-Cinema. ARRIRAW (3.4K) (6.5K) (source format), Digital Intermediate (4K) (master format). 2.39:1); m. Benj Pasek, Justin Paul; s. “The Greatest Show” (performed by Hugh Jackman, Keala Settle, Zac Efron, Zendaya & The Greatest Showman Ensemble) m/l. Benj Pasek, Justin Paul, Ryan Lewis, “A Million Dreams” (performed by Ziv Zaifman, Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, Skylar Dunn, Austyn Johnson, Cameron Seely), “Come Alive” (performed by Hugh Jackman, Keala Settle, Daniel Everidge, Zendaya & The Greatest Showman Ensemble), “The Other Side” (performed by Hugh Jackman & Zac Efron), “Never Enough” (performed by Loren Allred), “This Is Me” (performed by Keala Settle & The Greatest Showman Ensemble), “Rewrite the Stars” (performed by Zac Efron & Zendaya), “Tightrope” (performed by Michelle Williams), “From Now On” (Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams & The Greatest Showman Ensemble) m/l. Benj Pasek, Justin Paul; m sup. Mark Wike; chor. Shannon Holtzapffel, Ashley Wallen; ed. Tom Cross, Robert Duffy, Joe Hutshing, Michael McCusker, Jon Poll, Spencer Susser; pd. Nathan Crowley; ad. Laura Ballinger; set d. Debra Schutt; cos. Ellen Mirojnick; m/up. Nicki Ledermann, Whitney James, Jerry Popolis, Mary L. Mastro; sd. Dror Mohar, Lewis Goldstein (Dolby Digital | Dolby Atmos); sfx. Garry Elmendorf; vfx. Mathieu Raynault, Anish Ratna Tuladhar, Mark O. Forker, David Isyomin, Eran Dinur, Chris LeDoux, Gaia Bussolati, Radley Teruel, Prabhakar Maharjan, John Helms, Cliff Welsh, Dann Tarmy, Vincent Poitras, Martin Lipmann, Keith Sellers; st. Victor Paguia, Mathieu Leopold; rel. 20 December 2017 (USA), 26 December 2017 (UK); cert: PG; r/t. 105m.

cast: Hugh Jackman (P.T. Barnum), Michelle Williams (Charity Barnum), Zac Efron (Phillip Carlyle), Zendaya (Anne Wheeler), Rebecca Ferguson (Jenny Lind), Austyn Johnson (Caroline Barnum), Cameron Seely (Helen Barnum), Keala Settle (Lettie Lutz), Sam Humphrey (Tom Thumb), Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (W.D. Wheeler), Eric Anderson (Mr. O’Malley), Ellis Rubin (Young Barnum), Skylar Dunn (Young Charity), Daniel Everidge (Lord of Leeds), Radu Spinghel (O’Clancy), Yusaku Komori (Chang), Danial Son (Eng), Paul Sparks (James Gordon Bennett), Will Swenson (Philo Barnum), Linda Marie Larson (Mrs. Stratton).

Growing up in the early 1800s, P.T. Barnum (Jackman) displays a natural talent for publicity and promotion, selling lottery tickets by age 12. After trying his hands at various jobs, P.T. turns to show business to indulge his limitless imagination, rising from nothing to create the Barnum & Bailey circus. Featuring catchy musical numbers, exotic performers and daring acrobatic feats, Barnum’s mesmerizing spectacle soon takes the world by storm to become the greatest show on Earth. This is a triumph of style over content. The musical numbers are expansive, well-choreographed and wonderfully performed. The story , however, is given little room to breathe with short dialogue interludes serving to advance the plot between the songs. This would work well on stage, but in a movie it feels like the characters are short-changed and as a result the whole production is given an air of artificiality. This is not helped by the songs, which whilst memorable feel anachronistic. The result is a detached experience in which you can admire the spectacle without really caring about what is going on.

AAN: Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original Song) (Benj Pasek, Justin Paul for the song “This is Me”)

Film Review – STAR WARS: EPISODE III – REVENGE OF THE SITH (2005)

STAR WARS: EPISODE III – REVENGE OF THE SITH (2005, USA) ***½
Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi
dist. Twentieth Century Fox; pr co. Lucasfilm / Pandora Films / CTV Services; d. George Lucas; w. George Lucas; exec pr. George Lucas; pr. Rick McCallum; ph. David Tattersall (DeLuxe. 35mm (anamorphic) (Kodak Vision 2383), 70mm (horizontal) (IMAX DMR blow-up) (Kodak Vision 2383). Digital Intermediate (2K) (master format), Dolby Vision, HDCAM SR (1080p/24) (source format). 2.39:1); m. John Williams; ed. Roger Barton, Ben Burtt; pd. Gavin Bocquet; ad. Peter Russell; set d. Piero Di Giovanni, Richard Roberts; cos. Trisha Biggar; m/up. Nikki Gooley, Annette Miles, Josh Head; sd. Ben Burtt, Matthew Wood (DTS-ES | Dolby Digital EX | SDDS (uncredited) | Dolby Atmos); sfx. Rodney Burke; vfx. Roger Guyett, John Knoll; st. Nick Gillard; rel. 12 May 2005 (USA), 16 May 2005 (UK); cert: PG-13/12; r/t. 140m.

cast: Ewan McGregor (Obi-Wan Kenobi), Natalie Portman (Padmé), Hayden Christensen (Anakin Skywalker), Ian McDiarmid (Supreme Chancellor Palpatine), Samuel L. Jackson (Mace Windu), Jimmy Smits (Senator Bail Organa), Frank Oz (Yoda (voice)), Anthony Daniels (C-3PO), Christopher Lee (Count Dooku), Keisha Castle-Hughes (Queen of Naboo), Silas Carson (Ki-Adi-Mundi / Nute Gunray), Jay Laga’aia (Captain Typho), Bruce Spence (Tion Medon), Wayne Pygram (Governor Tarkin), Temuera Morrison (Commander Cody), David Bowers (Mas Amedda), Oliver Ford Davies (Sio Bibble), Ahmed Best (Jar Jar Binks), Rohan Nichol (Captain Raymus Antilles), Jeremy Bulloch (Captain Colton), Amanda Lucas (Terr Taneel), Kenny Baker (R2-D2), Matt Sloan (Plo Koon), Peter Mayhew (Chewbacca), Rebecca Jackson Mendoza (Queen of Alderaan), Joel Edgerton (Owen Lars), Bonnie Piesse (Beru Lars), Jett Lucas (Zett Jukassa), Tux Akindoyeni (Agen Kolar), Matt Rowan (Senator Orn Free Taa), Kenji Oates (Saesee Tiin), Amy Allen (Aayla Secura), Bodie Taylor (Clone Trooper), Graeme Blundell (Ruwee Naberrie), Trisha Noble (Jobal Naberrie), Claudia Karvan (Sola Naberrie), Keira Wingate (Ryoo Naberrie), Hayley Mooy (Pooja Naberrie), Sandi Finlay (Sly Moore), Katie Lucas (Chi Eekway), Genevieve O’Reilly (Mon Mothma), Warren Owens (Fang Zar), Kee Chan (Malé-Dee), Rena Owen (Nee Alavar), Christopher Kirby (Giddean Danu), Matthew Wood (General Grievous (voice)), Kristy Wright (Moteé), Coinneach Alexander (Whie), Olivia McCallum (Bene (as Mousy McCallum)), Michael Kingma (Wookiee General Tarfful), Axel Dench (Wookiee), Steven Foy (Wookiee), Julian Khazzouh (Wookiee), James Rowland (Wookiee), David Stiff (Wookiee), Robert Cope (Wookiee).

It has been three years since the Clone Wars began. Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi (McGregor) and Jedi Knight Anakin Skywalker (Christensen) rescue Chancellor Palpatine (McDiarmid) from General Grievous, the commander of the droid armies, but Grievous escapes. Suspicions are raised within the Jedi Council concerning Chancellor Palpatine, with whom Anakin has formed a bond. Asked to spy on the chancellor, and full of bitterness toward the Jedi Council, Anakin embraces the Dark Side. This is a visually impressive final instalment of parts 1-3 of the STAR WARS saga. Whilst many of the problems encountered in the first two films – notably the flat lead performances and leaden dialogue – remain, here the stakes are higher and as such the viewing experience is more rewarding. There is also a better balance between the political intrigue and the action sequences. The latter, however, often appear overly choreographed resulting in reduced tension as the viewer marvels at the movement rather than becomes embroiled in the struggle. The final act is largely engrossing but also feels manufactured in that it attempts to tie everything neatly into the set-up for part 4, which was released twenty-eight years earlier.

AAN: Best Achievement in Makeup (Dave Elsey, Nikki Gooley)

Film Review – STAR WARS: EPISODE II – ATTACK OF THE CLONES (2002)

STAR WARS: EPISODE II – ATTACK OF THE CLONES (2002, USA) ***
Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi
dist. Twentieth Century Fox; pr co. Lucasfilm / Recce & Production Services / Mestiere Cinema; d. George Lucas; w. George Lucas, Jonathan Hales (based on a story by George Lucas); exec pr. George Lucas; pr. Rick McCallum, Lorne Orleans; ph. David Tattersall (Colour. 35 mm (anamorphic) (Kodak Vision 2383), 70 mm (horizontal) (IMAX DMR blow-up) (Kodak Vision 2383), Digital (Texas Instruments DLP 1280 x 1024, 1.9: 1 anamorphic). Digital Intermediate (2K) (master format), Dolby Vision, HDCAM (1080p/24) (source format) (matted to 2.39: 1). 2.39:1); m. John Williams; ed. Ben Burtt; pd. Gavin Bocquet; ad. Peter Russell; set d. Peter Walpole; cos. Trisha Biggar; m/up. Lesley Vanderwalt, Sue Love; sd. Ben Burtt, Matthew Wood (DTS-ES | Dolby Digital EX | SDDS | Dolby Atmos); sfx. David Young, Geoff Heron, Tom Harris; vfx. Pablo Helman, John Knoll, Dennis Muren, Ben Snow; st. Nick Gillard; rel. 12 May 2002 (USA), 14 May 2002 (UK); cert: PG/PG; r/t. 142m.

cast: Ewan McGregor (Obi-Wan Kenobi), Natalie Portman (Padmé), Hayden Christensen (Anakin Skywalker), Christopher Lee (Count Dooku / Darth Tyranus), Samuel L. Jackson (Mace Windu), Frank Oz (Yoda (voice)), Ian McDiarmid (Supreme Chancellor Palpatine), Pernilla August (Shmi Skywalker), Temuera Morrison (Jango Fett), Jimmy Smits (Senator Bail Organa), Jack Thompson (Cliegg Lars), Leeanna Walsman (Zam Wesell), Ahmed Best (Jar Jar Binks / Achk Med-Beq (voice)), Rose Byrne (Dormé), Oliver Ford Davies (Sio Bibble), Ronald Falk (Dexter Jettster (voice)), Jay Laga’aia (Capt. Typho), Andy Secombe (Watto (voice)), Anthony Daniels (C-3PO / Dannl Faytonni), Silas Carson (Ki-Adi-Mundi / Viceroy Nute Gunray), Ayesha Dharker (Queen Jamillia), Joel Edgerton (Owen Lars), Daniel Logan (Boba Fett), Bonnie Piesse (Beru), Anthony Phelan (Lama Su (voice)), Rena Owen (Taun We (voice)), Alethea McGrath (Madame Jocasta Nu), Susie Porter (Hermione Bagwa / WA-7), Matt Doran (Elan Sleazebaggano), Alan Ruscoe (Lott Dod), Matt Sloan (Plo Koon), Veronica Segura (Cordé), David Bowers (Mas Amedda), Steve John Shepherd (Naboo lieutenant), Bodie Taylor (Clone Trooper), Matt Rowan (Senator Orn Free Taa), Steven Boyle (Senator Ask Aak / Passel Argente), Zachariah Jensen (Kit Fisto), Alex Knoll (J.K. Burtola), Phoebe Yiamkiati (Mari Amithest), Kenny Baker (R2-D2).

Set ten years after the events of THE PHANTOM MENACE, the Republic continues to be mired in strife and chaos. A separatist movement encompassing hundreds of planets and powerful corporate alliances poses new threats to the galaxy that even the Jedi cannot stem. These moves, long planned by an as yet unrevealed and powerful force, lead to the beginning of the Clone Wars — and the beginning of the end of the Republic. This continuation of the STAR WARS saga delves deeper into the political intrigue, but has enough action sequences, some of which fail to convince with their logic, to keep the less demanding viewers entertained. Where the film pales in comparison to those that preceded it are in the characters and the actor’s performances. McGregor, Christensen and Portman lack the personality of Hamill, Ford and Fisher from the original trilogy. What humour is there is uninspired and largely repeats lines from earlier movies. Portman and Chsritensen, in particular, are given wooden dialogue to work with but fail to rise above their material in a way Christopher Lee in particular does. There is little emotional resonance despite the big themes at play. Technically, though, the film is a triumph. The visuals are highly impressive, albeit it increasingly CGI dependant. Lucas’s direction, though, is workmanlike and he fails to bring his own material to life in a way he did back in 1977. Followed by STAR WARS: EPISODE III – REVENGE OF THE SITH (2005).

AAN: Best Visual Effects (Rob Coleman, Pablo Helman, John Knoll, Ben Snow)