Shaft released theatrically in USA today

Image result for shaftToday sees the release of Tim Story’s version of Shaft. The director noted for his Ride Along films has controversially adopted a similar action-comedy-buddy movie tone which is completely out of kilter with Ernest Tidyman’s creation. Reviews of the movie have been mixed and the aggregator sites suggest an average rating of around 5 out of 10. I will have to wait until 28 June, when Netflix distributes the movie on its streaming service in the UK before I am able to make my own judgement.

In the meantime, I continue to feel this has been a wasted opportunity to re-introduce the character to cinema audiences and to formally introduce Shaft to a new generation. I have suggested before that David F. Walker’s comic book prequel Shaft: A Complicated Man would have made for a perfect adaptation.  David really got under the skin of Tidyman’s creation in that book and it would have been a great starting point for the movie franchise relaunch.  If the producers had chosen to go back to the start, set the movie in period – with all its social attitudes highlighted in a serious manner and Shaft’s character traits properly explained – this could have been a successful and authentic adaptation.

Film Review – ABSOLUTE POWER (1997)

Image result for absolute power 1997ABSOLUTE POWER (USA, 1997) **½
      Distributor: Columbia Pictures; Production Company: Castle Rock Entertainment / Malpaso Productions; Release Date: 4 February 1997 (USA), 30 May 1997 (UK); Filming Dates: 3 June 1996 – 14 August 1996; Running Time: 122m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | SDDS; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Clint Eastwood; Writer: William Goldman (based on the novel by David Baldacci); Executive Producer: Tom Rooker; Producer: Clint Eastwood, Karen S. Spiegel; Associate Producer: Michael Maurer; Director of Photography: Jack N. Green; Music Composer: Lennie Niehaus; Film Editor: Joel Cox; Casting Director: Phyllis Huffman; Production Designer: Henry Bumstead; Art Director: Jack G. Taylor Jr.; Set Decorator: Richard C. Goddard, Anne D. McCulley; Costumes: Deborah Hopper; Make-up: Tania McComas, Francisco X. Pérez; Sound: Bub Asman, Alan Robert Murray; Special Effects: Steve Riley.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Luther Whitney), Gene Hackman (President Richmond), Ed Harris (Seth Frank), Laura Linney (Kate Whitney), Scott Glenn (Bill Burton), Dennis Haysbert (Tim Collin), Judy Davis (Gloria Russell), E.G. Marshall (Walter Sullivan), Melora Hardin (Christy Sullivan), Kenneth Welsh (Sandy Lord), Penny Johnson Jerald (Laura Simon), Richard Jenkins (Michael McCarty), Mark Margolis (Red Brandsford), Elaine Kagan (Valerie), Alison Eastwood (Art Student), Yau-Gene Chan (Waiter), George Orrison (Airport Bartender), Charles McDaniel (Medical Examiner), John Lyle Campbell (Repairman), Kimber Eastwood (White House Tour Guide), Eric Dahlquist Jr. (Oval Office Agent), Jack Stewart Taylor (Watergate Doorman), Joy Ehrlich (Reporter), Robert Harvey (Cop).
      Synopsis: A career thief witnesses a horrific crime involving the U.S. President.
      Comment: Highly implausible and lacking in pace, this is made watchable by the presence of Eastwood as the burglar who witnesses the crime and Harris as the cop who tries to hunt him down. Hackman is solid as ever as the President but is given little to work with by the script after the tense opening scenes. Davis’ performance is completely misjudged as if she is acting in another, more comedic, movie. The plot plays out in routine fashion and lacks heightened drama in its climax. A disappointing effort from Eastwood after a golden run.
      Notes: Marshall’s final appearance in a theatrical film.

Film Review – THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY (1995)

Image result for the bridges of madison countyTHE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY (USA, 1995) ****
      Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures; Production Company: Warner Bros. Pictures / Amblin Entertainment / Malpaso Productions; Release Date: 2 June 1995 (USA), 15 September 1995 (UK); Filming Dates: 15 September 1994 – 31 October 1994; Running Time: 135m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: DTS | Dolby Digital; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: 12.
      Director: Clint Eastwood; Writer: Richard LaGravenese (based on the novel by Robert James Waller); Producer: Clint Eastwood, Kathleen Kennedy; Associate Producer: Michael Maurer, Tom Rooker; Director of Photography: Jack N. Green; Music Composer: Lennie Niehaus; Music Supervisor: Peter Afterman (uncredited); Film Editor: Joel Cox; Casting Director: Ellen Chenoweth; Production Designer: Jeannine Oppewall; Art Director: William Arnold; Set Decorator: Jay Hart; Costumes: Colleen Kelsall; Make-up: Michael Hancock; Sound: Bub Asman, Alan Robert Murray; Special Effects: Steve Riley.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Robert Kincaid), Meryl Streep (Francesca Johnson), Annie Corley (Carolyn Johnson), Victor Slezak (Michael Johnson), Jim Haynie (Richard Johnson), Sarah Zahn (Young Carolyn), Christopher Kroon (Young Michael), Phyllis Lyons (Betty), Debra Monk (Madge), Richard Lage (Lawyer Peterson), Michelle Benes (Lucy Redfield), Alison Wiegert (Child #1), Brandon Bobst (Child #2), Pearl Faessler (Wife), R.E. ‘Stick’ Faessler (Husband), Tania Mishler (Waitress #1), Billie McNabb (Waitress #2), Art Breese (Cashier), Lana Schwab (Saleswoman), Larry Loury (UPS Driver), James Rivers (James Rivers Band), Mark A. Brooks (James Rivers Band), Peter Cho (James Rivers Band), Eddie Dejean Sr. (James Rivers Band), Jason C. Brewer (James Rivers Band), Kyle Eastwood (James Rivers Band), George Orrison (Café Patron), Ken Billeter (Café Patron), Judy Trask (Café Patron), David Trask (Café Patron), Edna Dolson (Café Patron), Dennis McCool (Café Patron), Michael C. Pommier (Café Patron), Jana Corkrean (Café Patron), M. Jane Seymour (Café Patron), Karla Jo Soper (Café Patron).
      Synopsis: Photographer Robert Kincaid wanders into the life of housewife Francesca Johnson, for four days in the 1960s.
      Comment: A sublime example of how a top-class director and two wonderful central performances can elevate a standard sentimental romantic drama into something much more. Streep is utterly convincing as the Italian housewife falling for Eastwood’s travelling photographer. Eastwood the director knows Streep’s qualities as an actress to inhabit the roles she plays and maximises her contribution, whilst himself producing an atypical sensitive portrayal. Whilst the story offers nothing new to the genre, the interplay between the stars is so powerful as to carry the familiar material through to its logical conclusion.
      Notes: Streep received an Academy Award for Best Actress nomination in 1996 for her performance in the film.

No cinema release for Shaft outside of the USA?

Carl Roberts makes some very sound points in his article Netflix vs Cinema – The World gets Shafted on the seeming removal of choice to view the new Shaft in cinemas outside of the USA. So far all that has been announced is the movie will stream on Netflix worldwide from 28 June. The movie has been given no official BBFC certification in the UK and is not listed on any of the reliable sites showing UK cinema release dates. As the promotional campaign gathers momentum, Shaft fans outside of the USA will feel extremely miffed they will have to subscribe to a streaming service if they want to see this movie. Dubious tactics and not at all supportive of the cinema experience.

Netflix Vs. Cinema | The World Gets Shafted!

Book Review – STRIP JACK (1992) by Ian Rankin

STRIP JACK (1990) ***½
by Ian Rankin
First published by Orion 1992
This edition published by Orion, 2011, 304pp (279pp)
ISBN: 978-0-7528-8356-4
includes an introduction by Ian Rankin and Reading Group Notes.

Blurb: Gregor Jack, MP, well-liked, young, married to the fiery Elizabeth – to the outside world a very public success story. But Jack’s carefully nurtured career plans take a tumble after a ‘mistake’ during a police raid on a notorious Edinburgh brothel. Then Elizabeth disappears, a couple of bodies float into view where they shouldn’t, and a lunatic speaks from his asylum. Initially, Rebus is sympathetic to the MP’s dilemma – who hasn’t occasionally succumbed to temptation? – but with the disappearance of Jack’s wife the glamour surrounding the popular young man begins to tarnish. Someone wants to strip Jack naked and Rebus wants to know why…

Ian Rankin’s fourth Rebus book sees the author maturing in his writing and the character of Rebus settling down into the one who would populate the rest of the series. The plot again is singular and Rankin delves into the world of politics as well as again exploring his favourite theme of the Jekyll and Hyde nature of his characters. Whilst the mystery elements are fairly routine – a cast of suspects all with a motive – the real pleasure here is in Rebus’ determination and resilience to see the case through and the fact that he makes mistakes along the way makes the character all the more human. It would be four more books and five more years before the series came of age and stepped beyond its police procedural roots into more complex works of fiction, but the seeds are sown here.

The Rebus Series:

Knots and Crosses (1987) ***
Hide and Seek (1991) ***
Tooth and Nail (original title Wolfman) (1992) ***
Strip Jack (1992) ***½
The Black Book (1993) ***
Mortal Causes (1994) ***
Let it Bleed (1996)
Black and Blue (1997) ****½
The Hanging Garden (1998) ****
Dead Souls (1999) ****
Set in Darkness (2000) ****
The Falls (2001) ****
Resurrection Men (2002)
A Question of Blood (2003) ****
Fleshmarket Close (2004) ****
The Naming of the Dead (2006)  ****½
Exit Music (2007) ****
Standing in Another Man’s Grave (2012) ***½
Saints of the Shadow Bible (2013) ***
Even Dogs in the Wild (2015) ****
Rather Be the Devil (2016) ***½
In a House of Lies (2018) ***½

Film Review – A PERFECT WORLD (1993)

A Perfect World (1993)A PERFECT WORLD (USA, 1993) ****
      Distributor: Warner Bros.; Production Company: Warner Bros. / Malpaso Productions; Release Date: 24 November 1993 (USA), 24 December 1993 (UK); Filming Dates: 29 April 1993 – 16 July 1993; Running Time: 138m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby Digital; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Clint Eastwood; Writer: John Lee Hancock; Producer: Clint Eastwood, Mark Johnson, David Valdes; Director of Photography: Jack N. Green; Music Composer: Lennie Niehaus; Film Editor: Joel Cox, Ron Spang; Casting Director: Phyllis Huffman; Production Designer: Henry Bumstead; Art Director: Jack G. Taylor Jr.; Set Decorator: Alan Hicks; Costumes: Erica Edell Phillips; Make-up: James Lee McCoy, Francisco X. Pérez; Sound: Alan Robert Murray; Special Effects: John Frazier.
      Cast: Kevin Costner (Butch Haynes), Clint Eastwood (Red Garnett), Laura Dern (Sally Gerber), T.J. Lowther (Phillip Perry), Keith Szarabajka (Terry Pugh), Leo Burmester (Tom Adler), Paul Hewitt (Dick Suttle), Bradley Whitford (Bobby Lee), Ray McKinnon (Bradley), Jennifer Griffin (Gladys Perry), Leslie Flowers (Naomi Perry), Belinda Flowers (Ruth Perry), Darryl Cox (Mr. Hughes), Jay Whiteaker (Superman), Taylor Suzanna McBride (Tinkerbell), Christopher Reagan Ammons (Dancing Skeleton), Mark Voges (Larry), Vernon Grote (Prison Guard), James Jeter (Oldtimer), Ed Geldart (Fred Cummings), Bruce McGill (Paul Saunders), Nik Hagler (General Store Manager), Gary Moody (Local Sheriff), George Haynes (Farmer), Marietta Marich (Farmer’s Wife), Rodger Boyce (Mr. Willits), Lucy Lee Flippin (Lucy), Elizabeth Ruscio (Paula), David Kroll (Newscaster), Gabriel Folse (Officer Terrance), Gil Glasgow (Officer Pete), Dennis Letts (Governor), John Hussey (Governor’s Aide), Margaret Bowman (Trick ‘r Treat Lady), John M. Jackson (Bob Fielder), Connie Cooper (Bob’s Wife), Cameron Finley (Bob Fielder, Jr.), Katy Wottrich (Patsy Fielder), Marco Perella (Road Block Officer), Linda Hart (Eileen, Waitress), Brandon Smith (Officer Jones), George Orrison (Officer Orrison), Wayne Dehart (Mack), Mary Alice (Lottie), Kevin Jamal Woods (Cleveland), Tony Frank (Arch Andrews), Woody Watson (Lt. Hendricks).
      Synopsis: A kidnapped boy strikes up a friendship with his captor: an escaped convict on the run from the law, headed by an honourable U.S. Marshal.
      Comment: Intelligent and thoughtful pursuit movie which is driven by Costner’s complex central performance as the escaped prisoner on the run and the remarkable young Lowther as his 8-year-old hostage. Themes of father/son neglect are sensitively handled and the developing relationship between Costner and Lowther is the core of Hancock’s nicely judged script. Eastwood takes more of a back seat as he plays the Texas Ranger on Costner’s tail with Dern’s psychologist in tow. The climax is perfectly judged.

Film Review – IN THE LINE OF FIRE (1993)

Image result for in the line of fire 1993IN THE LINE OF FIRE (USA, 1993) *****
      Distributor: Columbia TriStar Films; Production Company: Columbia Pictures Corporation / Castle Rock Entertainment; Release Date: 8 July 1993 (USA), 27 August 1993 (UK); Filming Dates: 3 October 1992 – 11 January 1993; Running Time: 128m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Dolby SR (35 mm prints) | SDDS (8 channels) (35 mm prints); Film Format: 35 mm, 70 mm (blow-up); Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Wolfgang Petersen; Writer: Jeff Maguire; Executive Producer: Gail Katz, Wolfgang Petersen, David Valdes; Producer: Jeff Apple; Director of Photography: John Bailey; Music Composer: Ennio Morricone; Film Editor: Anne V. Coates; Casting Director: Janet Hirshenson, Jane Jenkins; Production Designer: Lilly Kilvert; Art Director: John Warnke; Set Decorator: Kara Lindstrom; Costumes: Erica Edell Phillips; Make-up: Werner Keppler, Barbara Lacy, James Lee McCoy; Sound: Gregg Baxter, Wylie Stateman; Special Effects: Rocky Gehr; Visual Effects: Nancy Bernstein, Robert M. Greenberg, George Merkert.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Frank Horrigan), John Malkovich (Mitch Leary), Rene Russo (Lilly Raines), Dylan McDermott (Al D’Andrea), Gary Cole (Bill Watts), Fred Dalton Thompson (Harry Sargent), John Mahoney (Sam Campagna), Gregory Alan Williams (Matt Wilder), Jim Curley (President), Sally Hughes (First Lady), Clyde Kusatsu (Jack Okura), Steve Hytner (Tony Carducci), Tobin Bell (Mendoza), Bob Schott (Jimmy Hendrickson), Juan A. Riojas (Raul), Elsa Raven (Booth’s Landlady), Arthur Senzy (Paramedic), Patrika Darbo (Pam Magnus), Mary Van Arsdel (Sally), Ryan Cutrona (LAPD Brass), Lawrence Lowe (FBI Technician), Brian Libby (FBI Supervisor), Eric Bruskotter (Young Agent), Patrick Caddell (Political Speaker), John Heard (Professor Riger), Alan Toy (Walter Wickland), Carl Ciarfalio (CIA Agent Collins), Walt MacPherson (Hunter), Robert Peters (Hunter), Tyde Kierney (Police Captain Howard), Anthony Peck (FBI Official), Rick Hurst (Bartender), Doris E. McMillon (D.C. News Anchor), Robert Sandoval (Bellboy), Joshua Malina (Agent Chavez), William G. Schilling (Sanford Riggs), Michael Kirk (Computer Technician / Bates), Richard G. Camphuis (Party Fat Cat), Marlan Clarke (Marge), Robert Alan Beuth (Man at Bank), Susan Lee Hoffman (Woman at Bank), Donna Hamilton (Reporter at Dulles), Bob Jimenez (Reporter at Hotel), Cylk Cozart (Agent Cozart), Michael Zurich (Agent Zurich), Rich DiDonato (Undercover Agent), Jeffrey Kurt Miller (Undercover Agent), Kirk Jordan (Agent).
      Synopsis: Secret Service agent Frank Horrigan (Eastwood) couldn’t save Kennedy, but he’s determined not to let a clever assassin (Malkovich) take out this president.
      Comment: Eastwood is at his absolute best in this crackerjack thriller that is expertly and efficiently directed by Petersen. Malkovich makes for a creepy villain whose verbal sparring with Eastwood adds depth to his psychotic assassin. Russo sparks charmingly with Eastwood, who delivers one of his strongest and deepest performances. Morricone’s score is evocative and helps heighten the tension. Ultimately, this is text-book filmmaking of the highest order that perfectly marries script, direction, cast and editing.
      Notes: 3 Nominations for Oscar: Best Supporting Actor (John Malkovich), Editing, Screenplay.

Film Review – UNFORGIVEN (1992)

Clint Eastwood and Jaimz Woolvett in Unforgiven (1992)UNFORGIVEN (USA, 1992) ****½
      Distributor: Warner Bros.; Production Company: Warner Bros. / Malpaso Productions; Release Date: 3 August 1992 (USA), 18 September 1992 (UK); Filming Dates: 26 August 1991 – 12 November 1991; Running Time: 131m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby (as Dolby Stereo); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Clint Eastwood; Writer: David Webb Peoples; Executive Producer: David Valdes; Producer: Clint Eastwood; Associate Producer: Julian Ludwig; Director of Photography: Jack N. Green; Music Composer: Lennie Niehaus; Film Editor: Joel Cox; Casting Director: Phyllis Huffman; Production Designer: Henry Bumstead; Art Director: Adrian Gorton, Rick Roberts; Set Decorator: Janice Blackie-Goodine; Costumes: Glenn Wright; Make-up: Michael Hancock; Sound: Alan Robert Murray, Walter Newman; Special Effects: John Frazier.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Bill Munny), Gene Hackman (Little Bill Daggett), Morgan Freeman (Ned Logan), Richard Harris (English Bob), Jaimz Woolvett (The ‘Schofield Kid’), Saul Rubinek (W.W. Beauchamp), Frances Fisher (Strawberry Alice), Anna Levine (Delilah Fitzgerald), David Mucci (Quick Mike), Rob Campbell (Davey Bunting), Anthony James (Skinny Dubois), Tara Frederick (Little Sue), Beverley Elliott (Silky), Liisa Repo-Martell (Faith), Josie Smith (Crow Creek Kate), Shane Meier (Will Munny), Aline Levasseur (Penny Munny), Cherrilene Cardinal (Sally Two Trees), Robert Koons (Crocker), Ron White (Clyde Ledbetter), Mina E. Mina (Muddy Chandler), Henry Kope (German Joe Schultz), Jeremy Ratchford (Deputy Andy Russell), John Pyper-Ferguson (Charley Hecker), Jefferson Mappin (Fatty Rossiter), Walter Marsh (Barber), Garner Butler (Eggs Anderson), Larry Reese (Tom Luckinbill), Blair Haynes (Paddy McGee), Frank C. Turner (Fuzzy), Sam Karas (Thirsty Thurston), Lochlyn Munro (Texas Slim), Ben Cardinal (Johnny Foley), Philip Maurice Hayes (Lippy MacGregor), Michael Charrois (Wiggens), William Davidson (Buck Barthol), Paul Anthony McLean (Train Person #1), James Herman (Train Person #2), Michael Maurer (Train Person #3), Larry Joshua (Bucky), George Orrison (The Shadow), Greg Goossen (Fighter).
      Synopsis: A retired Old West gunslinger reluctantly takes on one last job, with the help of his old partner and a young man.
      Comment: Eastwood’s revisionist Western strips away the old mythology surrounding the gunfighters and the lawmen, delivering the vulnerable and violent reality of killing. The film is perfectly paced to capture the nuances in the script and the performances of a wonderful cast, with Hackman, Harris, Freeman and Eastwood all turning in note-perfect interpretations. Gentle acoustic score by Niehaus adds melancholy to the mix alongside wonderful location photography from Green utilising the beautiful landscapes of Alberta, Canada standing in for Wyoming. One of the all-time great Westerns.
      Notes: Winner of four Oscars: Best Picture; Actor in a Supporting Role (Hackman); Director and Film Editing. Only the third western to ever win the Best Picture Oscar. The other two being DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990) and CIMARRON (1931). The final screen credit reads, “Dedicated to Sergio and Don”, referring to Eastwood’s mentors, Sergio Leone and Don Siegel.

Film Review – CLIFFHANGER (1993)

Image result for cliffhanger 1993CLIFFHANGER (Italy/France/USA, 1993) ***½
      Distributor: Guild Film Distribution; Production Company: Carolco Pictures / Canal+ / Pioneer / RCS Video / Cliffhanger Productions; Release Date: 26 May 1993 (USA), 25 June 1993 (UK); Filming Dates: 11 April 1992 – 19 August 1992; Running Time: 113m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Dolby Digital (35 mm prints) (Europe) | Dolby SR (35 mm prints) (USA); Film Format: 35 mm, 70 mm (blow-up); Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Renny Harlin; Writer: Michael France, Sylvester Stallone (based on a story by Michael France from a premise by John Long); Executive Producer: Mario Kassar; Producer: Renny Harlin, Alan Marshall; Associate Producer: Jim Davidson, Tony Munafo; Director of Photography: Alex Thomson; Music Composer: Trevor Jones; Film Editor: Frank J. Urioste; Casting Director: Mindy Marin; Production Designer: John Vallone; Art Director: Maria-Teresa Barbasso, Aurelio Crugnola, Christiaan Wagener; Set Decorator: Robert Gould, Cynthia Sleiter; Costumes: Ellen Mirojnick; Make-up: Jeff Dawn; Sound: Scott Martin Gershin, Wylie Stateman, Gregg Baxter; Special Effects: R. Bruce Steinheimer; Visual Effects: John Bruno, Neil Krepela, Jay Riddle.
      Cast: Sylvester Stallone (Gabe Walker), John Lithgow (Qualen), Michael Rooker (Hal Tucker), Janine Turner (Jessie Deighan), Rex Linn (Richard Travers), Caroline Goodall (Kristel), Leon (Kynette), Craig Fairbrass (Delmar), Gregory Scott Cummins (Ryan), Denis Forest (Heldon), Michelle Joyner (Sarah), Max Perlich (Evan), Paul Winfield (Walter Wright), Ralph Waite (Frank), Trey Brownell (Brett), Zach Grenier (Davis), Vyto Ruginis (Matheson), Don S. Davis (Stuart), Scott Hoxby (Agent Hayes), John Finn (Agent Michaels), Bruce McGill (Treasury Agent), Rosemary Dunsmore (Treasury Secretary), Kim Robillard (Treasury Jet Pilot), Jeff McCarthy (Pilot), Mike Weis (Mike – Co-Pilot), Duncan Prentice (Treasury Helicopter Pilot), Kevin Donald (Ray), Jeff Blynn (Marvin), Thor (Thor).
      Synopsis: A botched mid-air heist results in suitcases full of cash being searched for by various groups throughout the Rocky Mountains.
      Comment: Highly enjoyable and exciting, if wildly overblown and often preposterous. Stallone is at his macho best as the lead mountain rescue climber with a chip on his shoulder and the group dynamics give you heroic characters to root for. Lithgow is deliciously over-the-top as the chief villain. Harlin directs with a great feel for action scenes and with flair and pace. Wonderful scenic photography and incredible stunt work. The memorable opening sequence is a real humdinger and superbly edited.
      Notes: Set in Colorado, but filmed in the Cortina d’Ampezzo-Dolomites mountains, because of their spectacular similarities to the Colorado Rockies. Dedicated to Wolfgang Gullich, Sylvester Stallone’s double in the film, who was killed in a car accident shortly after filming had finished.